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River Park on the Clyde among plans council considering for Broomielaw regeneration

Plans for the regeneration of Broomielaw, a historic area in Glasgow city centre on the north bank of the Clyde that is key to the further regeneration of both the city centre and the River Clyde corridor, were today (7 February) considered by Glasgow City Council.

 

The plans include a proposal for a world-class River Park along both banks of the Clyde; an examination of the benefits and negative impacts of the M8 motorway on the area; establishing a vibrant mixed-use riverfront community featuring high-quality contemporary design; creating new public and green spaces; and instilling a collaborative approach to attracting investment and funding.

 

A public consultation on these plans – which will be delivered through the Broomielaw District Regeneration Framework, currently at draft stage – will begin on 8 February.

 

Broomielaw is an area with notable existing strengths, such as the successful International Financial Services District; its status as a strategic and highly accessible location which acts as a gateway between the city centre and destinations such as the SEC Campus, Glasgow Airport, the city’s West End and South Side; and its tremendous potential in the form of increasing developer activity and interest which may lead to a growing population in the area.

 

Challenges remain in Broomielaw, with few quality public spaces, sparse and piecemeal residential development, the M8 separates the district from the West End, and the area has an under-developed night-time economy and is heavily car-dominated.  In addition, parts of the riverside in the area are an under-utilised asset that must be addressed to attract investment and development.

 

The Broomielaw district is one of nine in Glasgow city centre identified through the council’s City Centre Strategy, with each of these districts to have its own strategy and District Regeneration Frameworks (DRFs) that would see it taking a distinct role in making a more sustainable, mixed-use city centre.

 

The first of these districts to have such a strategy – essentially a 10-year regeneration plan – was the Sauchiehall and Garnethill District whose DRF was developed over 18 months with significant community and stakeholder engagement. This district features the first Avenues project in the city, the Sauchiehall Avenue, funded by the Glasgow City Region City Deal, which will be complete this year.

 

The Broomielaw District Regeneration Framework (BDRF) is the second DRF for the city centre, and has been developed collaboratively by a multi-disciplinary team led by Austin Smith Lord and MVRDV, working with the local community, businesses, owners, developers, investors and other stakeholders and organisations.  The consultation period between 9 February and 5 April will offer a further opportunity to help shape the plans, after which the final Broomielaw DRF and Action Plan will be produced.

 

The draft Broomielaw DRF contains a number of recommendations and proposals, with an understanding that resource constraints will limit what actions are taken forward, with this being guided by identified priorities.  The final action plan for the DRF will reflect actions that are deliverable in funding, resource and outcome terms.

 

Seven strategic themes have been developed for the BDRF and associated draft action plan:

 

  • (Y)our River Park: this is a proposal to create a world-class linear public space along both banks of the River Clyde.  This continuous urban park would transform the river, kick-start development and become a key destination and attraction in the city centre.  The aim is to create a quality urban park amenity characterised by water, green and public spaces activate by event and play spaces, recreation and cultural activity for all ages in all seasons, all weather, all day, for all Glaswegians and visitors;

 

  • (Y)our Urbanised M8: this aims to maintain the benefits of an urban motorway while reducing its negative impacts.  Many consultees have highlighted the convenience and connectivity benefits of the motorway, however the majority of consultees recognised its negative impact – separating neighbourhoods, creating a physical barrier between the city centre, and its West End and North, and exacerbating the area’s pollution and traffic congestion.  Anderston Cross is an unpleasant experience for pedestrians and cyclists.

 

  • (Y)our Great Streets and Spaces: this theme seeks to respond to the car-dominated character of the district and address the shortage of quality green and public spaces. Broken connections need to be addressed throughout the district and investment in public spaces and the physical environment is essential.

 

  • (Y)our Great Buildings: this theme promotes actions to respect Glasgow’s historic built heritage with the highest quality contemporary design.  Clear guidance about the desired qualities of new design will assist development, and the BDRF promotes the development of character-specific areas with an emphasis on pedestrian and cyclist accessibility.

 

  • (Y)our Updated Mobility: this incorporates proposals to enhance the city centre’s public transport and active travel networks to create a sustainable, walkable city, and will include a review of the City Centre Transport Strategy in the context of the BDRF objectives and the recommendations of the Connectivity Commission;

 

  • (Y)our Vibrant Broomielaw: this theme proposes the establishment of a lively, attractive mixed-use riverfront district and a significant uplift in the residential population so that the area becomes more lively, with more night-time economy, leading to more viable amenities and a sustainable, walkable and activated district;

 

  • (Y)our Transforming Broomielaw: this focuses on the creation of agile policies and shared objectives to attract investment, secure funding and foster collaborative working in the district.  Transforming this district cannot however be delivered by the council alone; this must be a truly collaborative partnership between all stakeholders.  Despite the lack of public ownership, GCC will look to work with partners to develop masterplan strategies for both sides of the river.

 

The Broomielaw DRF will become Supplementary Planning Guidance once it and the city centre Strategic Development Framework is approved by the council.  This will allow it to have the status of a material consideration, and it will be referenced and used to make development decisions in the district.  The BDRF Planning Policy section provides the context for the Broomielaw district, and provides criteria against which development proposals will be assessed.

 

The council’s GCC City Centre Regeneration Team will ensure that there is a way for residents and other stakeholders to continue to be involved and input to the process as projects are developed and delivered.  Engagement is ongoing with the Blythswood and Broomielaw community council.

 

Councillor Susan Aitken, Leader of Glasgow City Council, said: “These ambitious plans will help the council and our partners to bring Broomielaw to its full potential and allow the area to take its proper place in the life of the city.  This is a part of Glasgow that has enormous scope to influence the future development of the city centre and the river corridor, so please take the opportunity to help shape the final plans by taking part in the consultation on the Broomielaw District Regeneration Framework.”

 

The draft Broomielaw District Regeneration Framework can be found at: https://www.glasgowcitycentrestrategy.com/broomielaw-district-regeneration-framework-public-consultation.htm.

 

The public consultation, which will take the form of an online survey, or comments by email or post, can be found at the city council’s Consultation Hub at:  https://www.glasgow.gov.uk/index.aspx?articleid=17317 from 8 February.

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Council approves new strategy to make best use of its property and land estate

Glasgow City Council today (7 February) approved a Property and Land Strategy which will guide how the council makes the best use of its substantial property and land estate, the biggest in the city.  The possible relocation of council offices from the city centre to key regeneration areas across Glasgow is one action being considered through the strategy.

 

The strategy will help improve services to communities, reduce public costs and raisie income for the council, increase community engagement and regenerate neighbourhoods across the city over the next decade.

 

The council has more than 1,000 operational properties, including schools and nurseries, care homes, offices, community and sports centres, museums, galleries and libraries, as well as surplus property and land.

 

The size of this estate means that it plays a significant role in the life of the city, helping neighbourhoods throughout Glasgow thrive, and the council is committed to working with local communities to rethink how these are used to ensure that – in an era of challenging finances for local authorities – its facilities are fit for purpose; solutions are found to protect our built heritage; derelict sites are restored to productive use; and that ownership is opened up to other groups and organisations where appropriate and possible.

 

The possible relocation of some council offices from the city centre to regeneration areas in various parts of the city would allow not only more effective delivery of council services but also act as a catalyst for the social and economic regeneration of local communities.  Locating council offices or facilities in particular areas plays a key role in attracting investment, development and creating local employment opportunities.

 

The council will also work with community groups, public agencies and third sector organisations to ensure that services meet local needs and priorities, and the Property and Land Strategy will inform how these needs and priorities are best met through the council’s estate through measures such as co-location and investment in / repurposing of sites.

 

Councillor Kenny McLean, City Convener for Neighbourhoods, Housing and Public Realm at Glasgow City Council, said: “Over the next decade, the adoption of the council’s Property and Land Strategy will mean our estate will be used more efficiently and effectively, with the people of Glasgow more closely involved and better served.  The council will also have reduced costs in the years ahead, as well as the ability to raise capital receipts to help deliver improved public services in the city.  The proper location of these services will aid the regeneration of neighbourhoods throughout Glasgow, and deliver real, inclusive economic growth.”

 

Three complementary asset plans will support the Property and Land Strategy: the Community Asset Plan; the Built Heritage Plan; and the Vacant and Derelict Land Plan.  The first of these reflects the council’s commitment to the greater involvement and empowerment of our citizens; the second provides a consistent and considered approach to the stewardship of the council’s built heritage; and the third addresses the potential blight, cost and missed opportunity that vacant and derelict properties and land can represent for the council and the city.

 

The council’s Property and Land Strategy, approved at today’s City Administration Committee, has five key objectives driving the approach to the use of, and investment in, its property and land estate between 2019 – 2022:

 

  • A more efficient, sustainable, smaller, and better quality estate;
  • An agile estate capable of meeting current and future service delivery needs;
  • Collaborating and co-locating with community planning partners, third sector organisations and city region partners;
  • Achieving cost reductions, increasing income and generating capital receipts; and
  • Embracing digital and technological innovation to reduce reliance on and improve the performance of the estate.

 

In order to achieve these objectives, a number of actions are being considered, including the relocation of city centre offices to support regeneration through the identification of suitable locations owned by the council or its partners in key regeneration districts, and planning for a phased withdrawal from these higher-cost city centre locations.  Such action would reduce public costs and increase local employment opportunities in these districts.

 

Another potential action being recommended is the development of multi-service/multi-agency community hubs across the city, which will allow greater community involvement and greater effectiveness and efficiency in service delivery.  Additionally, multi-service operation hubs will be established to increase collaborative and co-operative working; deliver economies of scale and raise capital receipts through the sale of released sites.

 

The council will also work with communities to co-design future delivery needs, with local communities being directly involved in local sites.  Communities will also be given the opportunity to take over the ownership and management of community assets through Community Asset Transfer.

 

Where council properties are of particular cultural or heritage importance, an innovative approach to their management and purpose will be taken, with plans put it in place – working with local and national heritage bodies – to maintain and protect these buildings and put them to productive use where appropriate.

 

The strategy will also repurpose the council’s under-occupied and surplus properties through identification of those properties which will be developed in the long-term and those which can be marketed, and this will reduce costs, raise capital receipts and allow regeneration by both the public and private sectors.

 

The final action of the strategy will be to ensure that future investment in council property minimises environmental impact and establishes affordable life-cycle maintenance through whole-life financial modelling and adapting low-carbon technologies, delivering reduced repair costs and a leaner, greener estate.

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10,000 Families to benefit from more free early learning and childcare

More than 10,000 families across the city could be in line to benefit from more free and fully funded early learning and childcare (ELC) in Glasgow’s nurseries following an agreement and cross party support at today’s City Administration Committee today – Thursday 7 February.

Glasgow families earning up to £45,000 will now be offered 900 hours of free ELC provision for three and four year olds from August 2019 – an additional 300 hours of their current statutory entitlement.

Partner providers will also be able to offer this should they wish.

This is an increase of the current household threshold of £30,000 introduced by the City Government last year as the council works towards rolling out the Scottish Government’s national commitment of  1140hrs fully funded early learning expansion plans for all 3 and 4 year olds and eligible 2 year olds by August 2020.

The committee report also outlines the council’s commitment to our valued partner providers by announcing the new commissioning rate – an increase of 54% to £5.40 per hour which will be available from August 2019.

This will help partners as they make their own phasing plans for the introduction of 1140hrs by August 2020.

Councillor Chris Cunningham, City Convener for Education, Skills & Early Years said: “This proposal will mean more fully funded early learning and childcare hours for thousands of our families and will be a big help towards the monthly bills in a time when everyone is feeling the pinch.

“I’m delighted that our proposal received cross party support at today’s City Administration Committee – we predict that from August as many as 10,000 Glasgow families will benefit with more access to a quality, flexible and affordable early years’ service.

“I’m also delighted to announce, as we work towards a phased introduction of 1140 fully funded hours for all 3 and 4 year olds and eligible 2 year olds, the council’s new sustainable partner provider rate.

“This will hopefully bring reassurance to our valued partners that we are committed to continue to work together to deliver in Glasgow’s quality early learning and childcare settings.”

Children’s Minister Maree Todd said: “It’s fantastic to see Glasgow City Council striding ahead and increasing the number of funded early learning and childcare hours to 900 hours from this August for the vast majority of families with 3 and 4 year olds in the city.  This means more children will receive high quality childcare city-wide before they’ve even set foot in school and parents and carers will enjoy more choice and flexibility across the private, public and voluntary sectors.

“International research has proven that universally accessible and high quality early years education helps to provide children with skills and confidence to carry into school.  I look forward to seeing these positive changes to children’s lives as a result of Glasgow’s early roll-out.”

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Council Agrees to buy legacy Hub in Dalmarnock

Glasgow city council today (07 February 2019) agreed to exercise its right of pre-emption over The Legacy Hub, in Dalmarnock, meaning that it can buy back the former council-owned land and Hub building from Administrators.

In 2014, the council and a number of other funders supporting a new community initiative, sold the land for the construction of the Hub to the People’s Development Trust (PDT) for a nominal sum of £1.

As the council was not selling the land for commercial value it created a right of pre-emption, effectively a right of first refusal in its favour to buy back the land, in the event of a future sale by PDT.

Following the PDT being placed into administration at the end of January, the Administrators, KPMG, acting on PDT’s behalf, have now offered the land and buildings back to the council for the same sum.

The council’s Contracts and Property Committee agreed that it should take the necessary steps to accept this offer and acquire the ownership of the Hub.

Looking to the future of the Hub, the committee also agreed that officers could enter into negotiations with KPMG to buy any equipment within the Hub including IT and catering equipment, and furniture items that would be needed by the council for the future running of the building.

Following completion of the sale, which may take a number of weeks due to the legal and due diligence process, the council will also take over landlord responsibilities for the tenants still operating from the Hub.

Work will now take place by council officers to investigate a range of options for the running and management of the building. They will also consider, with input from key stakeholders, including the community, how best it can serve the local area while ensuring the Hub has a sustainable economic model for the future.

Convenor for Neighbourhoods, Housing and Public Realm City Policy Committee and member of the Contracts and Property Committee, Councillor Greg Hepburn, said: “The news of the PDT’s administration and subsequent impact on The Legacy Hub and the services it provided, including the nursery, was a blow to the local community.

“However, after repeated attempts to stabilise the governance and financial side of things it became clear that it simply could not continue operating the way it had been.

“Now that the council are planning to buy back the Hub we have a chance to start afresh for a well-run, ambitious and thriving community facility, giving the community what they need but also something that is sustainable for the future.

“I look forward to working with the local community to influence the future of the of The Legacy Hub and realise their aspirations.”

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‘Let’s grow together’ is the call to anyone interested in growing food in Glasgow ahead of series of workshops intended to shape the city’s new food growing strategy.

As part of Glasgow’s commitment to becoming a sustainable food city, the council wants to see people to grow more food in their own neighbourhoods. It is envisaged that growing would take place in a wide variety of settings such as raised beds, planters, community gardens, allotments and orchards and include fruit, vegetables, herbs and flowers.

Under the Community Empowerment Act, the council now also has a responsibility to identify and increase the land within the city that can be used for allotments and, more generally, for plant cultivation. The legislation also expects there to be a focus on areas of socio-economic disadvantage when seeking to identify land for allotments and cultivation.

To ensure this work is directed properly, the council is currently developing a food growing strategy and is looking for the views of people involved with allotment associations, community gardens, food networks and food poverty groups as well as those on allotment waiting lists and members of the public simply interesting in growing.

To gather these view eight workshops are set to take place across the city between February and May 2019 with the first scheduled for Tollcross Leisure Centre on February 7 at 6pm. These workshops will aim to get an understanding of food growing currently underway in Glasgow, generate interest in food growing and identify potential growing sites. In addition, three of the eight workshops will also look the themes of social enterprise, outdoor learning and health in relation to food growing.

Councillor Anna Richardson, City Convenor for Sustainability and Carbon Reduction, urged anyone with an interest in growing their own food to come along to the workshops, which are free to attend.

Councillor Richardson said: “Ensuring Glasgow becomes a sustainable food city is a key part of the council’s overall plan for the city. Local food growing can help to address the city’s issues with food poverty but also promotes positive physical and mental well-being.

“Becoming a sustainable food city will only happen if we grow together as a food growing community. There is already considerable growing expertise in gardens, allotments and other spaces all across the city and it is essential we tap into this knowledge and experience as we shape our food growing strategy.

“The workshops are also about encouraging people who are interested in growing to get more involved. Participating in the workshops will give people a chance to have their say on the future of food growing in Glasgow.”

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Food growing workshops to help Glasgow become a sustainable food city

grow-together

‘Let’s grow together’ is the call to anyone interested in growing food in Glasgow ahead of series of workshops intended to shape the city’s new food growing strategy.

grow-together

As part of Glasgow’s commitment to becoming a sustainable food city, the council wants to see people to grow more food in their own neighbourhoods. It is envisaged that growing would take place in a wide variety of settings such as raised beds, planters, community gardens, allotments and orchards and include fruit, vegetables, herbs and flowers.

Under the Community Empowerment Act, the council now also has a responsibility to identify and increase the land within the city that can be used for allotments and, more generally, for plant cultivation. The legislation also expects there to be a focus on areas of socio-economic disadvantage when seeking to identify land for allotments and cultivation.

To ensure this work is directed properly, the council is currently developing a food growing strategy and is looking for the views of people involved with allotment associations, community gardens, food networks and food poverty groups as well as those on allotment waiting lists and members of the public simply interesting in growing.

To gather these view eight workshops are set to take place across the city between February and May 2019 with the first scheduled for Tollcross Leisure Centre on February 7 at 6pm. These workshops will aim to get an understanding of food growing currently underway in Glasgow, generate interest in food growing and identify potential growing sites. In addition, three of the eight workshops will also look the themes of social enterprise, outdoor learning and health in relation to food growing.

Councillor Anna Richardson, City Convenor for Sustainability and Carbon Reduction, urged anyone with an interest in growing their own food to come along to the workshops, which are free to attend.

Councillor Richardson said: “Ensuring Glasgow becomes a sustainable food city is a key part of the council’s overall plan for the city. Local food growing can help to address the city’s issues with food poverty but also promotes positive physical and mental well-being.

“Becoming a sustainable food city will only happen if we grow together as a food growing community. There is already considerable growing expertise in gardens, allotments and other spaces all across the city and it is essential we tap into this knowledge and experience as we shape our food growing strategy.

“The workshops are also about encouraging people who are interested in growing to get more involved. Participating in the workshops will give people a chance to have their say on the future of food growing in Glasgow.”

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Street Change Glasgow to Help Transform Lives of City’s Most Vulnerable

begging

Glasgow is to set up an Alternative Giving scheme to help transform the lives of people of who participate in begging.

 

An online donation facility, contactless giving points and a website will be created so people can contribute to a fund which will pay for practical items such as clothes to attend a job interview, tickets for public transport to access training or essential tools or safety equipment to start work.

begging

Third Sector partners including Simon Community Scotland, Glasgow Homelessness Network and The Big Issue are teaming up with the city council, the Chamber of Commerce and Police Scotland, to create a scheme similar to one in Manchester.

 

Assistance provided will be practical and tailored to a person’s individual needs. Partners, such as the Simon Community, who work with vulnerable people , will apply to the fund on their behalf. Decisions on support will be made quickly to ensure people are able to seize opportunities to improve their lives.

 

Businesses and other city organisations will be invited to become ambassadors for the scheme, providing “in kind”, financial support or work experience for suitable candidates. Firms tendering for council contracts may also be encouraged to back the scheme via “community benefit” clauses.

 

The city’s Begging Strategy Group visited Manchester and Liverpool to learn how difference alternative giving schemes operate successfully and what type would be most suitable for Glasgow. Members also liaised with Cardiff, Cambridge and the Association of City and Town Centre Managers.

 

Councillor Allan Casey, Chair of the Begging Strategy Group, said: “Glasgow is a generous city and people care deeply about those who are vulnerable and marginalised. They regularly give their spare change to people who are begging. This may help in the short term, but may not bring about positive, long term change in that person’s life.

 

“The new alternative giving scheme will offer the public a new way to help, which aims to deliver long term change for individuals – giving them personalised practical support to improve their lives by pursuing positive paths.

 

“Not everyone who begs is homeless, but this scheme will operate in tandem with existing services in the city such as the new roving Digital Inclusion Officer, the Housing First Scheme and homelessness services. We aim to remove barriers preventing people from rising out of poverty and no longer having to participate in begging.”

 

People with personal experience of begging in Glasgow will be involved in the scheme’s creation and also in deciding which applications are approved.

 

Street Change Glasgow is another initiative by the city’s Begging Strategy Group which aims to ensure people do not have to beg. A Digital Inclusion Officer was recently employed to work alongside the Simon Community’s Street Team. She goes out to talk to people who are begging and uses a tablet computer to ensure they are registered to receive all the benefits they are entitled to, as well as preparing them for the transition to Universal Credit.

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Valentine’s Massacre

FBCOVER

‘Slay together, stay together – Valentine Massacre in store for horror-loving couples’

 

Who said celebrating Valentine’s Day had to be soppy? Halloween may be a distant memory but Glasgow horror fans looking for another terrifying fix need not worry.

FBCOVER

Popcorn Horror, the independent collective behind Glasgow Horror Fest have revealed several additional horror events for 2019. The first of these is Valentine’s Massacre – An Alternative, Horror Themed Couples Night. If you’d like to celebrate Valentine’s Day, but can’t stand all things pink and fluffy – the event boasts varied line-up of terrifying shows, films, attractions and experiences, all with a dark romance theme.

 

Following the success of hosting Glasgow Krampus Market and guests having the opportunity to meet and take pictures with the mythical beast, Popcorn Horror are excited to reveal that Cupid will be available for a similar experience. Be warned though, this cupid is not an adorable cherub but a twisted love demon with an appetite for human hearts!

Killer couples can expect a night to die for, with the line-up also boasting a live show from the incredible Ash Pryce: Psychic Con-Man. Ash is a paranormal illusionist, who will be presenting an original show combining mind reading and spooky illusions with a Valentine’s theme.

 

Of course, what would Valentine’s Day be without a romantic movie? Valentine’s Massacre will be offering a film program of romantic-horror features and shorts. Expect lots of love, guts and gore in a curated selection of unnerving alternatives to the usual cinema offerings. Excitingly, the 15 Second Horror Film Challenge have prepared an exclusive program of micro-shorts – all delving into the darkness and twisted tales of romance. Body-horror, zombie infestation and monsters are set to shock audiences in these little slices of terror.

 

Aside from the main stage, couples will also have opportunity to take part in a range of horror attractions. Picasso Painters will be ready to give couples a horror makeover for the night, turning them into some of the screen’s scariest couples. Experience a makeover, into one of horror’s most memorable couples. Chucky and Tiffany, The Monster and Bride, Jack and Sally – and other demented duos. The Hidden Hermit will also be available for couple’s tarot reading sessions accompanied by gorgeous horror themed decks.

 

And of course, alternative Valentine gifts will be on offer from a selection of vendors, and not a fuzzy bear or a bunch of flowers in sight! Chocokat.chocolates will have her incredible selection of edible treats from her hand crafted chocolates stand – including realistic gory edible body parts and intricate chocolates featuring horror characters. Caitylou Creations will have a selection of her hand-made horror jewelry, as well as some monster crochet pieces – including the legendary Cthulhu. Printer Ronald Gray will be offering custom, on the spot t-shirt design for those appropriately horrific couples shirts you can’t find anywhere else, while Inkabella Bows will have a stall stuffed with horror accessories.

 

Bring a ghoulish lover or fiendish friend on a date to die for this Valentine’s Day, just make sure you both leave with your hearts intact!

 

Valentine’s Massacre – An Alternative, Horror Themed Couples Night

Blackfriars, Glasgow

14th February 2019

Event Info/Tickets – http://valerianemassacre.eventbrite.com

Event Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/events/379299722802495

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COUNCILLORS ASKED TO BACK EQUAL PAY DEAL

equal-pay

SETTLEMENT of Glasgow’s long-running equal pay dispute is set to move a step closer, with councillors being asked to formally approve a cash offer to claimants.

Earlier this month, the council and the equal pay claimant group represented by Action4Equality, UNISON, GMB and UNITE reached an agreement in principle on a package of payments worth around £500 million.

Today [Friday, 1 Feb], the council published a report that will go before members of its City Administration Committee next week.

equal-pay

In addition to asking councillors to approve the deal, the report outlines how the settlement will be funded – with some of the city’s property assets to be used to unlock loans.

Council leader Susan Aitken said she expects members to back her deal, which could see claimants receive compensation payments from as early as June this year.

“I’m delighted that we have agreement with the claimants and to be able to recommend to my colleagues a deal that finally delivers pay justice for thousands of women in our workforce,” she said.

“After a decade going round in circles in the courts, we have reached a fair settlement through twelve months of tough but open and honest negotiations.

“This report is our opportunity to put right a wrong that has damaged the council, its workforce and the city for too long. I trust that every member will want to take that opportunity.”

The paper, which will go to committee on Thursday, February 7, also includes further detail on how the council plans to meet the cost of the settlement – seeking authority to use property assets to secure loans.

Wholly-owned arm’s-length company City Property Glasgow Investments LLP is currently engaging lenders with the aim of refinancing a loan originally taken in 2010 – releasing significant additional value due to a growth in the value of its assets and more favourable interest rates.

It is also proposed that the council will sell a significant further portfolio of operational buildings to City Property and then lease them back at a commercial rate.

The purchase would be funded by long-term loans, with the lease payments meeting the annual cost of the borrowing.

Crucially, this means the buildings would remain in the city’s ownership and users would not see any difference in how they access them on a day-to-day basis.

Discussions are still ongoing with potential funders, however the council expects the Emirates Arena, Riverside Museum, SEC Armadillo, Scotstoun Leisure Centre, Tollcross International Swimming Centre, Glasgow Royal Concert Hall, Glasgow Museums Resource Centre, City Halls, Toryglen Football Centre, Gorbals Leisure Centre and Bellahouston Leisure Centre to become part of the City Property portfolio.

Cllr Aitken said: “I’ve always been clear that, although settling equal pay has been about delivering justice for thousands of the women in our workforce, meeting the substantial cost of doing that must be fair for citizens.

“Releasing the potential of our property, while keeping it in the city’s ownership, protects services and the future of these valued assets.”

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GLASGOW AIRPORT RADAR PROJECT CLEARS MAJOR WIND FARM DEVELOPMENT FOR TAKE OFF

terma

Plans for one of the largest wind farm developments in Scotland have been given the green light following the installation of a state-of-the-art radar system at Glasgow Airport.

Together with air traffic services company, NATS, and Banks Renewables, Glasgow Airport has introduced a new radar earlier that can mitigate the impact of the Kype Muir Wind Farm near Strathaven, South Lanarkshire. The development will generate 88.4MW of renewable energy from its 26 turbines.

NATS will manage the dual Terma SCANTER 4002 radar system which is capable of supporting air traffic control requirements and mitigating the impact of the turbines. The system is now operational and NATS has secured the contract to operate and maintain the service for the 25-year life of the wind farm.

Due to their height and movement patterns, wind turbines can have a range of impacts on navigational systems, including being detected by Primary Surveillance Radar (PSR) and appearing on air traffic control screens. This can have a number of impacts including distracting controllers, masking ‘real’ aircraft and mimicking the appearance of actual aircraft to the extent that they must be avoided by other aircraft. Such impacts can have a detrimental impact on the safety, efficiency and capacity of the airspace surrounding airport.

As a statutory consultee, Glasgow Airport must assess wind farm development proposals up to 50 kilometres away. Importantly, it must ensure any proposed development will not pose a risk to the safety of the 30 airlines who fly over nine million passengers to and from the airport every year.

Glasgow Airport Managing Director Mark Johnston said: “We are very pleased to announce that the system is now fully operational. For the last three years, the Airport’s planning team has been worked extremely hard with our partners from NATS and Banks Renewables to develop this wind turbine mitigation solution in what is a very complex and safety critical environment.

“As well as resolving the issue with Kype Muir, the mitigation may also have the potential to resolve issues with other future wind farm proposals, which can only be of benefit to Scotland’s renewable energy sector.”

Cabinet Secretary for Transport, Infrastructure and Connectivity Michael Matheson said:  “It’s great to see Glasgow Airport hosting the launch of this new radar system, which is a significant development for aviation safety.

“The new radar is able to distinguish between aircraft and wind turbines situated at Kype Muir Wind Farm, and this technology will be invaluable with the ever-growing sustainable energy sector.”  

Andrew Liddell, Technical Director with Banks Renewables, said: “We’re especially thankful to Glasgow Airport for engaging with us to deliver the new radar. This means that not only will our new wind farm stay clear of any radar detection – but other new wind farms may also benefit from this regional solution.

“We also acknowledge how proactive and instrumental the Scottish Government has been in helping deliver such a positive outcome.”

Paul Beat, NATS General Manager at Glasgow Airport, said: ““We’re delighted to have worked with Glasgow Airport, Banks Renewables and TERMA to deliver a mitigation solution that both supports safe and efficient air traffic services, while also allowing this important wind farm development to be built and make a major contribution to the Scottish Government’s renewables strategy.”

 

Glasgow was one of the first airports in the world to deploy large scale wind turbine mitigation in the form of infill radar and has continued to innovate by deploying single turbine blanking in response to the increasing number of developments.

 

As a result, it has approved 90% of the 495 wind turbine applications it received between October 2012 and August 2016. These projects have the potential to generate more than 700MW of energy.