** Now in Glasgow**

Just hopeing to find Rocky safe and in a loving home**

I orginally rescued Rocky a 1 year old tri coloured border collie from a couple who was abusive to him for a good part of his life. I took him in to find a forever home for him. He is loving little boy who just forgave and forgave. I thought I found a lovely forever home for him with a couple who promised me they would provide him with a loving home and had all the necessities for Rocky.

I was contacted two days ago from one of their family members worried about Rocky and didn’t know where he was and on one occasion that they were aware of he was left abandon in a forest without water for three days before police picked him up in Dufftown I then contacted the couple who owned up to it and didn’t know where he was either but that he was given to another man but who then sold him to a couple in Burghead. I contacted that couple who then sold them to someone in Ellon once I finally was contacted over Facebook from them as I put a post up in the local group they notified me they sold him to a couple in Glasgow who just lost their own Collie 7 months ago.

I have been trying every chance I get to track him down and make sure he is in a loving home and is stable and there to stay. It’s been only 3 months since the original couple gave him away and he has had so many many owners who have gave up on him because of his past.

Please help me find him and share this post

The below photos are when he was with us.

Fat Mr F

Mr Fabulous was caught cutting some grass but who’s grass was he cutting? Where is he? In a public park? And why is he looking a bit on the heavy side?

Fat Mr F

A source within his team said that at the beginning of lockdown Mr Fabulous wasn’t very motivated and had been eating crisps, snacks, chocolate, basically eating unhealthily for a few weeks, which promotes an unhealthy life style, and is not like him at all. It seems like Mr fabulous has been struggling with his motivation but from what was said by a member of his team this may be because he has 3 kids and is trying to keep them motivated with school work and staying at home like most parents at the moment, but his family are all safe and well which is the important thing. It was also said that he had mixed feelings during this lockdown, educating, fun, exciting, stressful, draining, loving, upsetting but safe. The main thing keeping him going through lockdown is his positive attitude and looking forward to getting back out there doing what he does best.

Get Fit Don't Weight

Mr Fabulous was spotted helping a number of charities over the last few weeks by delivering food parcels and helping the elderly, at a safe distance of course, but also Mr Fabulous has just started a health and fitness challenge for ‘Hillhead Charity’ which helps children, families and vulnerable adults, and is hopefully going to help him get back into his sequence and on stage. By Oliver Sams (Mon 18 May 2020)

fat mr f

Mr Fabulous was caught cutting some grass but who’s grass was he cutting? Where is he? In a public park? And why is he looking a bit on the heavy side?

fat mr f

A source within his team said that at the beginning of lockdown Mr Fabulous wasn’t very motivated and had been eating crisps, snacks, chocolate, basically eating unhealthily for a few weeks, which promotes an unhealthy life style, and is not like him at all. It seems like Mr fabulous has been struggling with his motivation but from what was said by a member of his team this may be because he has 3 kids and is trying to keep them motivated with school work and staying at home like most parents at the moment, but his family are all safe and well which is the important thing. It was also said that he had mixed feelings during this lockdown, educating, fun, exciting, stressful, draining, loving, upsetting but safe. The main thing keeping him going through lockdown is his positive attitude and looking forward to getting back out there doing what he does best.

Mr Fabulous was spotted helping a number of charities over the last few weeks by delivering food parcels and helping the elderly, at a safe distance of course, but also Mr Fabulous has just started a health and fitness challenge for ‘Hillhead Charity’ which helps children, families and vulnerable adults, and is hopefully going to help him get back into his sequence and on stage. By Oliver Sams (Mon 18 May 2020)

birthday pic 6

Lockdown didn’t stop one of Scotland’s oldest women celebrating her 107th birthday at a Glasgow care home yesterday!

Ellen Gardner has lived through two World Wars and the 1920s Spanish Flu outbreak, so she wasn’t going to let the current Coronavirus pandemic spoil her celebrations.

Staff at Glasgow’s Orchard Grove Care Home pulled out all the stops to ensure Ellen’s milestone birthday was marked with a special party, complete with a DJ and a piper.

birthday pic 6

TV hadn’t been invented when Ellen was born in Glasgow’s East End in 1913, women couldn’t vote – the Suffragette movement was at its peak, George V was King and Asquith was Prime Minister.

But despite her grand age, Ellen, latterly of Auldhouse, still enjoys a party. She enjoyed special birthday cakes donated by McGee’s the Bakers, flowers from Glasgow’s Lord Provost and music provided by Orchard Grove employee and part-time DJ, Stephen Kay, who set up his decks in the home so all the residents could share in the fun while staying safely indoors.

Ellen's 107th 1

Pupils from Toryglen School hub for key workers also created Happy Birthday banners for the special occasion which was delivered, contact-free to the home.

Visitors are currently banned from entering UK care homes due to the Coronavirus outbreak, but Ellen’s son, Ronnie and his wife Liz, were able to safely see her open her presents and wish her happy birthday from outside the building in the garden area.

Retired surveyor, Ronnie of Clarkston, said: “I usually visit mum three times a week but haven’t been able to see her for weeks now because of the virus, which is a bit annoying. I’ve been able to phone her and the staff sent me a WhatsApp message of her in a wheelchair out in the gardens, but it was nice to see her on her birthday, even if it was from a distance. She seems to be keeping remarkably well and is in good health for her age.

“Everything the staff have done is really remarkable. The staff are excellent in the unit she is in. They are very thoughtful and always friendly to myself and my wife when we visit.”

Great-grandmother Ellen loved to travel when younger – visiting her other sons, Alan, and Johnston, in Canada, Hong Kong and South Africa. She also loved knitting, puzzles and Scrabble and was a member of South Shawlands Parish Church.

Ellen cared for her family and husband John who worked at Beardmores in Parkhead but sadly died of cancer in 1970. She also worked as a nursing auxiliary at Philipshill Hospital in East Kilbride and for Prudential Insurance.

E Gardner Honeymoon (2)

Glasgow Lord Provost, Councillor Philip Braat, sent Ellen a bouquet of flowers along with special birthday wishes.

He said: “I’d like to congratulate Ellen on this very special occasion. She has lived through some truly historic world events and her 107th birthday takes place amid yet another one. It is really heart-warming to hear of the hard work staff at Orchard Grove have put in to ensuring she can celebrate this momentous event and share it with her family despite social distancing and the lockdown. Their thoughtfulness and compassion at this exceptionally challenging time is commendable.”

Orchard Grove Care Home is run by Glasgow’s Health & Social Care Partnership.

SymaShazad_10

A woman who gave her mother a second chance at life by donating her kidney has spoken of the importance of people within black, Asian and other minority ethnic communities discussing organ donation ahead of World Kidney Day (12 March 2020).

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Syma Shahzad, 40, who donated to mum Anees Haq in 2008, shared how she was challenged about her decision due to conflicting beliefs and knowledge within her community, and encouraged people to think about what they would want to happen and discuss it with family.

Syma, who works as a pharmacist in Glasgow, added her support to the awareness drive ahead of World Kidney Day (12 March 2020), as statistics show the proportion of patients from minority ethnic communities in Scotland on transplant waiting lists has gradually increased over the past two years.

In March 2020, 10.5 per cent of those on the active waiting lists for a transplant from a deceased donor were recorded as being from a minority ethnic group, compared to 9.2 per cent in March 2018.

Statistics show that in the last five years, around half as many families of minority ethnic eligible donors supported organ donation after their loved one’s death, compared with the families of white eligible donors.

People from black and Asian communities are more likely to develop conditions such as high blood pressure, diabetes and certain forms of hepatitis than white people, which increases the likelihood of them needing a transplant1.

A kidney transplant is more successful if the donor and recipient share the same ethnicity.

Worried about the impact of dialysis on her mother’s life after she was diagnosed with chronic kidney disease in 2007, Syma raised the possibility of her donating her kidney.

A healthy person can lead a completely normal life with one kidney, and a kidney from a living donor generally offers the best outcomes for patients living with kidney failure who need a transplant.

Syma said:

“From the outset, our consultant at the Glasgow Royal Infirmary was fabulous. He helped us progress everything as quickly as possible so we could make sure the transplant went ahead before my mum had to start dialysis.  I had the first tests in March 2008, and successfully donated my kidney to her in the October of that year.”

Speaking about her faith Syma said:

“Being Muslim, there’s a lot of stigma attached to organ donation. I believe I wasn’t doing anything to put myself in danger, I was simply helping give my mother a better quality of life. For me that was the ultimate decider.

“My belief is that whatever your time is destined to be, your time will be; but whatever you can do to improve that quality of life is essential.

“Within our community, there are so many challenges around mindset and conflicting religious knowledge. I was very headstrong and wouldn’t let anyone dissuade me from doing this. With Asian people being at a higher risk of diabetes, and the associated kidney problems, I would love to see more people considering donation.

“I would encourage anyone who’s unsure about their stance on organ donation to sit down and consider what would happen if it was someone in your family who needed a transplant. Having been through it with my mother, if I could I’d do the same for anyone else in that situation.”

From Autumn 2020, the law around organ and tissue donation after death is set to change to an opt-out system.  This means that if people aged 16 and over have not recorded a decision about donation, they will be considered as a possible donor when they die, unless they are in one of the excluded groups.

Jen Lumsdaine, Lead Nurse for Living Donation Scotland said:

“Patients from black and minority ethnic backgrounds who need a kidney transplant tend to wait longer due to a shortage of donors.

“As Syma’s story illustrates, living donation can ensure a better outcome for the patient, and dramatically reduce the time a loved one has to spend on dialysis.

“Choosing to donate a kidney remains an exceptional gift, and living donation will continue to be vital part of continuing to improve transplant numbers when opt-out legislation is introduced, so more lives can be saved and transformed.”

To find out more about living donation visit livingdonationscotland.org

Cat Leaver

In celebration of this year’s International Women’s Day, The Ivy Buchanan Street is hosting an exclusive ticketed dinner and panel discussion with Cat Leaver, Chloe Milligan and Ann-Maree Morrison. Hosted on Wednesday, 11 March from 6.30pm to 10:00pm, the evening will touch upon inspirational stories including their biggest achievements, alongside motivational tips and advice on how to be the best in your business.

Cat Leaver

Led by Cat Leaver, director of Brand Scotland, and known for running TEDxGlasgow, the evening includes panel discussions with Chloe Milligan, founder of Mud Urban Flowers and Ann-Maree Morrison, Women20 for G20 UK Delegate and Head of Ecommerce task force.

With a diverse range of experience across various industries, the trio will be sure to inspire and motivate guests while sharing their own personal experiences and career journeys which have led to their success. It will also be a great opportunity for women to network and share challenges and advice with other women in the city.

Ann Maree Morrison

Guests will be treated to Champagne on arrival before being invited to pose questions in an intimate setting whilst enjoying a delicious three-course dinner with wine in The Ivy Buchanan Street’s private dining room, The Morgan Room; priced at £52 per person.

Chloe Milligan

Suzanne Gilchrist, General Manager at The Ivy Buchanan Street says: “The team at The Ivy Buchanan Street look forward to welcoming guests into The Morgan Room where they will receive a glass of Champagne on arrival and a three-course dinner, while enjoying an intimate evening recognising women across diverse industries who are doing great things.”

Tickets can be purchased from https://theivycollectionevents.giftpro.co.uk/events/international-womens-day-dinner-and-panel-discussion/.

Youngsters across Glasgow will be able to take part and enjoy free food and fun during the school holidays.

Glasgow City Council today (Thursday, 27 February) agreed to fund 70 organisations, through its Children’s Holiday Food Programme, with £2.3m to deliver a wide-ranging programme of healthy meals and activities during school holidays.

The Children’s Holiday Food Programme is funded by Glasgow City Council and delivered by charities, third sector organisations and community groups.

The council has dished out £3.7m since the programme was introduced in Summer 2018 to help address poverty in the city – specifically children’s holiday hunger.

The programme complements existing activities already in place by third sector organisations, with the majority of council funds going towards provision of food.

Last year, almost twenty thousand children and young people participated in the events and projects being served in every ward of the city.

Glasgow City Treasurer, Councillor Allan Gow, said: “This is fantastic news. Our Children’s Holiday Food Programme is making a real difference to the lives of hundreds of families and the health of thousands of children.

“This is an invaluable service for families in Glasgow.  Many struggle to feed their children, let alone during school holidays.

“By being able to provide third sector organisations with the means to deliver a continued programme of fun packed projects, we’re seeing a real difference in the lives and well-being of so many youngsters.

“While our holiday food programme focuses on the provision of food, feedback shows that is brings with it a host of other benefits from socialising more, exploring new foods, eating healthy food, learning cooking skills, being more active and interacting with other children and their peers.

“We remain committed to tackling food poverty and look forward to working with third sector organisations to deliver this invaluable programme again this year.”

All organisations to receive money from the Glasgow Holiday Food Programme 2020/2021 will be monitored by the council’s grant fund arrangements to ensure their projects stay on track.

The Glasgow Holiday Food Programme runs in the Spring, Summer, October and February school breaks.

The full report to the City Administration Committee can be found here: Children’s Holiday Food Programme 2020/21

Glasgow City Council today (6 February) adopted the Open Space Strategy for the city – a document that will identify and guide how open space can be used to improve health, liveability and the resilience of Glasgow.

 

Open spaces in Glasgow are diverse and include the city’s parks, gardens, allotments, civic spaces, rivers, lochs and ponds.

 

A draft version of the strategy was put out to public consultation, and the overwhelmingly positive response – along with the input of other stakeholders – helped to inform the future response.

 

Through the Open Space Strategy (OSS), there is now the ability to analyse open spaces on a local level, audit existing open spaces and their functions, and use this information to guide engagement on how best to use and manage these open spaces.

 

A process has been identified to help monitor and deliver how the strategy can achieve its aims of enhancing local quality of life and the environment, and this is shown below:

 

  • Establish current and future need;
  • Plan for current and future need;
  • Inform future use; and
  • Deliver future use.

 

Through this process, the strategy’s action plan will help to deliver the aims of a more healthy, liveable and resilient Glasgow.

 

The strategy will direct future decisions on open spaces, such as whether they should be enhanced or used for other open space purposes; where priorities for maintenance may lie; and where opportunities may exist to plant trees or let them regenerate naturally. It will also identify where new open spaces should be created and where using existing open spaces for other purposes may be appropriate.

 

The strategy has responded to the Climate Emergency – open space has a key role to play in providing for both carbon savings and in helping the city adapt to climate change – as well as the council’s recently-published Pollinator Plan, and will be published as an accessible, easy to read document.

 

Discussions with local communities and organisations will take place to establish aspirations for open spaces in their areas, and the council will work with partners – such as the NHS – to deliver mutually supporting aims. The strategy will also help to co-ordinate the roles, policies and strategies of council services with open space responsibilities.

 

Delivery of the strategy will also see the council supporting community groups to manage open spaces through asset transfer, participatory working and/or co-production; identifying options for maintaining open spaces less intensively – for instance, growing trees can reduce grass cutting that generate benefits for biodiversity; investigate where our open spaces might be able to generate income – e.g. by generating renewable heat or energy; and identifying whether there may be open spaces that are not needed to meet current or future need and where income may be generated from their sale.

 

Councillor Kenny McLean, City Convener for Neighbourhoods, Housing and Public Realm at Glasgow City Council, said: “Our open spaces are enormously important to us, socially, economically and environmentally, and considering how we can best use them is crucial to our future quality of life and success.  The Open Space Strategy for Glasgow will guide us in our efforts to make the city more healthy, liveable and resilient.”

A Glasgow City Council committee today (6 February) approved almost £70,000 ENV2 funding towards the creation of a children’s play area and a woodlands community space in the North Toryglen Transformational Regeneration Area (TRA).

 

Both the play area and the community space will be built on council-owned land.  ENV2 funding for these comes from contributions from the building of the Crudens’ housebuilding.

 

North Toryglen is one of Glasgow’s eight Transformational Regeneration Areas, with extensive demolition of unpopular housing stocks clearing land for new housing, with 100 socially-rented homes for GHA tenants displaced by demolition and 104 homes for sale (by Crudens) built.  Another 127 for sale are either on site or planned.  The area also now has a 120-bedspace elderly care home.

 

Although North Toryglen has benefited from these developments, the surrounding quality of open space and standards of connectivity with other areas need to be improved.  To address this, a greenspace group was set up though the local delivery group.  The main partners of this sub-group – Glasgow City Council, Clyde Gateway and Urban Roots – have now drawn up proposals for improvements, following public consultation events.

 

These proposals include the delivery of new public space, parkland and a network of sustainable transport routes with the intention the area will become more permeable, raising the profile for local residents, visitors and those using the through routes on bikes and other non-motorised transport.  The creation of the children’s play area and the woodlands community space will be important part of these proposals to come to, and will be delivered by the summer of 2022.

 

Both projects sit within the wider greenspace strategy for the area, which aims to attract a capital budget of almost £3.35million.  The greenspace group is attracting funding from Glasgow City Council; the Scottish Government’s Vacant & Derelict Land Fund; Scottish Natural Heritage’s Green Infrastructure Fund, SUSTRANS and Transforming Communities: Glasgow.

 

Councillor Susan Aitken, Leader of Glasgow City Council, said: “While the standard of housing in North Toryglen has been transformed in recent years, there have been issues with the quality of open space, accessibility and connections to surroundings areas.  The new children’s play area and woodlands community space will be the first of a series of projects to tackles these issues, allowing the community the chance to fully enjoy their local spaces.”

Thomas1

People who have conquered drug addiction have earned jobs with Glasgow services helping others on the road to recovery.

Glasgow Alcohol and Drug Recovery Service (GADRS) recently employed 13 new staff – half of whom are people with personal experience of addiction.

Thomas1

Dad-of-three, Thomas (aged 50) of the Gorbals, started sniffing solvents as a teenager in the 80s and later began to use opiates. Heroin addiction saw him overdosing more times than he can remember and spending years in and out of hospitals and prisons.

Thomas said: “I was aware of the potential consequences, but it was about trying to fit in and find a sense of belonging. It was a form of self-harm to cope with childhood trauma and it had a massive impact on my social, physical and psychological development.

“It also impacted on my family. They tried to be supportive, but they couldn’t understand it, and didn’t know what to do for the best. People understood alcohol addiction in the 1980s, but no-one was prepared for the explosion in drug addiction.”

Attitudinal change in the criminal justice system around the year 2000, set Thomas on the route to recovery after decades of destructive behaviour and stints in prison. Instead of jailing him for shoplifting to feed his habit, a sheriff gave him an 18 months suspended sentence and ordered him to undergo treatment in the community.

Thomas said: “The courts realised they weren’t solving anything by just locking people up. They gave me a chance. I started to engage with services, my care manager was supportive and helpful. I got access to psychotherapy to deal with childhood trauma and the underlying issues of my drug taking. I was sofa-surfing at the time, so I also got involved with homelessness services.”

Six months in rehab at Rainbow House in Glasgow helped him come off drugs and, despite a brief relapse in 2013, he hasn’t looked back. Thomas got involved with the South East Recovery After Care Group – one of the city’s first peer led groups to come out of discussions about service redesign with people with lived experience.

He volunteered full-time with the group and later earned a part-time post as a peer educator. He’s since gained SVQs in health and social care and community development, completed a three week placement in Sweden where he learned about the country’s work to get people recovering from addiction into employment and advised medical professionals and social workers on new treatment options in Glasgow such as the Heroin Assisted Treatment facility and the proposed Safer Drug Consumption Facility.

Thomas has been thrilled to help others in the Gorbals where he admits he was previously known for his addiction and is now known for his recovery.

He is now about to start a permanent, full-time post as a Social Care Worker with South Glasgow Alcohol and Drug Recovery Service.

His message to anyone grappling with addition is: “There is a better life out there. Sometimes it’s just about grabbing it with both hands, accepting help and creating and developing your own opportunities. There is a way out and there are people there to help you.”

Susanne Millar, Glasgow’s Chief Social Worker, believes the views of people with lived experience offer service providers real insight into the barriers to recovery.

She said: “Knowledge from people with lived experience is invaluable to the city’s Health and Social Care Partnership.

“They can understand and empathise with other people who are wrestling with addiction better than anyone else. They know the challenges people face and, importantly, they know coping mechanisms, how to tackle challenges and all about the various services available. We work closely with people with lived experience on many projects. Their input continues to help shape and redesign services, so that they are more easily accessible and deliver better outcomes for people with complex issues.

“People like Thomas are living proof that addiction can be overcome to rebuild successful, productive lives free from drugs and alcohol. I congratulate everyone who recently earned jobs with the recovery service and look forward to working with them all going forward.”

RECOVERY CAFES 

Glasgow has a network of recovery cafes across the city including Govanhill, the Gorbals, Whiteinch, Parkhead, Ibrox and Easterhouse.

They aim to reduce stigma around addiction, promote recovery by making it visible within communities and upskill people for new and improved lives after addiction.

Activities for people in recovery include table tennis, art classes, massage, yoga, reiki, welfare rights and housing advice, healthy lunches, shared experience sessions, recovery meetings, beauty and nail treatments. Children’s 1st also provide activities for children during the sessions.

The cafés aim to boost people’s self-confidence, help them overcome barriers to recovery and develop new skills to increase their employability.