woodside day care arvinder

A new dementia-friendly day care centre is transforming the lives of older people and their relatives in Glasgow.

woodside day care arvinder

Arvinder Kainth, believes Woodside Day Care Centre has improved her 88-year-old, blind and partially deaf, father’s life and given her family peace of mind.

 

Speaking at the official opening of Glasgow Health & Social Care Partnership’s new centre, she said her dad, Gurnam Singh Bedi, lost interest in life after his wife died, becoming very withdrawn and quiet.

cake cutting

Arvinder said: “My family were all very worried about my dad after mum died, until a friend introduced us to day care services for the elderly and disabled.

 

“Coming to Woodside has changed my father’s life. His quality of life has improved greatly and he wouldn’t miss a day here – even for a family occasion! He talks about the centre with fondness, and we, as a family, have peace of mind.

 

“Our father is happy, he is in a place where he is safe and is treated with respect and dignity. We also get respite and are able to take some time for ourselves.”

 

Councillor Susan Aitken, Leader of Glasgow City Council, officially opened the purpose built centre, and met service users who enjoy activities such as armchair bowls, dominos, bingo, yoga, quizzes, arts and crafts and outings. People usually attend for one, two or three days a week. They are collected from home each morning and driven to the centre in Hinshaw Street where they enjoy lunch and activities before heading home.

 

Eighty-three-year-old service user, Pavittar Majhu, praised the “polite and respectful” staff and the food at the centre which caters for any special dietary requirements. Pavittar told visitors she loves to sing Bollywood songs with friends at the centre as well as being pampered at the in-house hair salon.

 

She said: “The facilities in Woodside are amazing, including the beautiful gardens which are so therapeutic. I enjoy gardening at the centre and having a hairdresser here is wonderful.

“All the staff are polite and respectful and ensure all our needs are met. We enjoy all the cultural celebrations including Christmas and Halloween etc, Asian festivals like Diwali, Vaisakhi and Eid are also celebrated here.

 

“My family have visited Woodside and are very happy with the facilities. My son who is in a band, came and entertained us all.”

 

Cllr Aitken unveiled a plaque and cut a cake to mark the occasion after touring the facility and chatting to staff and service users.

 

She said: “This is really such an impressive place. There is a great atmosphere and everyone is very welcoming, positive and cheerful. The overwhelming feeling I’m getting from talking to everyone, is that you are all delighted with the facilities.

 

“There is so much life about the place, and the dedication and professionalism of the staff is obvious to see. From talking to them and seeing them in action, you can tell how much they care about service users and how they take pride and pleasure in ensuring everyone is looked after and happy.

 

“I’m delighted to declare this lovely day care centre officially open!”

 

Woodside can accommodate 30 older people a day Monday to Friday. Facilities include several activity rooms, a hair salon, a dining room, two sitting rooms, a quiet / prayer room, a hair salon and a treatment room as well as the dementia friendly garden with raised beds.

It provides a registered service for people with complex needs and service users are all assigned their own key worker.

 

Susanne Millar, Interim Chief Officer of Glasgow’s Health & Social Care Partnership, said it was committed to providing services which help people live in their own homes and communities for as long as possible.

 

She said: “This is a fabulous building with all the facilities that go with it. There is a lot of buzz and activity and it feels really homely and safe. I’d like to recognise all the hard work of staff that got us here. Thank you for your dedication.”

The day care centre is located alongside the HSCP’s new Woodside Health Centre.

Glasgow City Council today (6 February) adopted the Open Space Strategy for the city – a document that will identify and guide how open space can be used to improve health, liveability and the resilience of Glasgow.

 

Open spaces in Glasgow are diverse and include the city’s parks, gardens, allotments, civic spaces, rivers, lochs and ponds.

 

A draft version of the strategy was put out to public consultation, and the overwhelmingly positive response – along with the input of other stakeholders – helped to inform the future response.

 

Through the Open Space Strategy (OSS), there is now the ability to analyse open spaces on a local level, audit existing open spaces and their functions, and use this information to guide engagement on how best to use and manage these open spaces.

 

A process has been identified to help monitor and deliver how the strategy can achieve its aims of enhancing local quality of life and the environment, and this is shown below:

 

  • Establish current and future need;
  • Plan for current and future need;
  • Inform future use; and
  • Deliver future use.

 

Through this process, the strategy’s action plan will help to deliver the aims of a more healthy, liveable and resilient Glasgow.

 

The strategy will direct future decisions on open spaces, such as whether they should be enhanced or used for other open space purposes; where priorities for maintenance may lie; and where opportunities may exist to plant trees or let them regenerate naturally. It will also identify where new open spaces should be created and where using existing open spaces for other purposes may be appropriate.

 

The strategy has responded to the Climate Emergency – open space has a key role to play in providing for both carbon savings and in helping the city adapt to climate change – as well as the council’s recently-published Pollinator Plan, and will be published as an accessible, easy to read document.

 

Discussions with local communities and organisations will take place to establish aspirations for open spaces in their areas, and the council will work with partners – such as the NHS – to deliver mutually supporting aims. The strategy will also help to co-ordinate the roles, policies and strategies of council services with open space responsibilities.

 

Delivery of the strategy will also see the council supporting community groups to manage open spaces through asset transfer, participatory working and/or co-production; identifying options for maintaining open spaces less intensively – for instance, growing trees can reduce grass cutting that generate benefits for biodiversity; investigate where our open spaces might be able to generate income – e.g. by generating renewable heat or energy; and identifying whether there may be open spaces that are not needed to meet current or future need and where income may be generated from their sale.

 

Councillor Kenny McLean, City Convener for Neighbourhoods, Housing and Public Realm at Glasgow City Council, said: “Our open spaces are enormously important to us, socially, economically and environmentally, and considering how we can best use them is crucial to our future quality of life and success.  The Open Space Strategy for Glasgow will guide us in our efforts to make the city more healthy, liveable and resilient.”

A Glasgow City Council committee today (6 February) approved almost £70,000 ENV2 funding towards the creation of a children’s play area and a woodlands community space in the North Toryglen Transformational Regeneration Area (TRA).

 

Both the play area and the community space will be built on council-owned land.  ENV2 funding for these comes from contributions from the building of the Crudens’ housebuilding.

 

North Toryglen is one of Glasgow’s eight Transformational Regeneration Areas, with extensive demolition of unpopular housing stocks clearing land for new housing, with 100 socially-rented homes for GHA tenants displaced by demolition and 104 homes for sale (by Crudens) built.  Another 127 for sale are either on site or planned.  The area also now has a 120-bedspace elderly care home.

 

Although North Toryglen has benefited from these developments, the surrounding quality of open space and standards of connectivity with other areas need to be improved.  To address this, a greenspace group was set up though the local delivery group.  The main partners of this sub-group – Glasgow City Council, Clyde Gateway and Urban Roots – have now drawn up proposals for improvements, following public consultation events.

 

These proposals include the delivery of new public space, parkland and a network of sustainable transport routes with the intention the area will become more permeable, raising the profile for local residents, visitors and those using the through routes on bikes and other non-motorised transport.  The creation of the children’s play area and the woodlands community space will be important part of these proposals to come to, and will be delivered by the summer of 2022.

 

Both projects sit within the wider greenspace strategy for the area, which aims to attract a capital budget of almost £3.35million.  The greenspace group is attracting funding from Glasgow City Council; the Scottish Government’s Vacant & Derelict Land Fund; Scottish Natural Heritage’s Green Infrastructure Fund, SUSTRANS and Transforming Communities: Glasgow.

 

Councillor Susan Aitken, Leader of Glasgow City Council, said: “While the standard of housing in North Toryglen has been transformed in recent years, there have been issues with the quality of open space, accessibility and connections to surroundings areas.  The new children’s play area and woodlands community space will be the first of a series of projects to tackles these issues, allowing the community the chance to fully enjoy their local spaces.”

Glasgow City Council today (6 February) approved the release of the £132,000 final allocation of funding for heritage projects on and around Glasgow’s Canal.

 

This funding, from the Heritage Lottery Fund’s Great Space Scheme, is part of the £340,100 funding – with match funding bringing the project budget to almost £520,000 – that was given in 2018 to allow organisations along Glasgow’s Canal can work together to ensure that local heritage contributes more to meeting local social, environmental and economic objectives.

 

The Glasgow Canal Heritage project is being coordinated by Glasgow City Council, with some activities being delivered through local organisations, with the Glasgow Canal Co-operative – made up of local social, cultural, arts, sports and nature-based bodies, and delivering the Canal Festival – a key partner.

 

The project’s scope was developed in partnership with the Glasgow Canal Co-operative and Scottish Canals, and evolved out of the intensive local engagement undertaken in 2014 and 2015 for the two planning charrettes for Port Dundas and Woodside, Hamiltonhill, Applecross and Firhill.

 

Funding already allocated in 2018 and 2019 has supported the development of the Canal Festival, the Canal Stalled Spaces programme, and the Glasgow Canal Cultural Heritage and Arts Strategy and Action Plan.

 

The remaining part of the project has three components:

 

  • A physical commission – this will support the delivery of physical artworks (e.g. sculpture) within the canal corridor, to be led by Scottish Canals on behalf of the wider Glasgow Canal Regeneration Partnership (£64,000).
  • A digital commission – this part of the project looks to support the development of an app (or similar) to allow for visitors to engage with the heritage and development of Glasgow’s Canal through the use of technology. One possible option could see this linked with the roll-out of iPads to pupils across Glasgow (£32,000).
  • The Community Ideas Fund –  a grant fund to be used to support community groups to bring forward proposals that explore and unlock local heritage projects linked to the canal and the overall aims and objectives of the Heritage Lottery Fund’s Great Places project and the key themes emerging from the Glasgow Canal Heritage and Arts Strategy.  While guidance on the types of project that could be brought forward has been provided, this fund is very much intended to allow local community groups to bring forward their own ideas and projects.  This project will be administered by the Glasgow Canal Co-operative (£36,000).

 

The Glasgow Canal Heritage Project will be completed by December 2020.

 

Councillor Kenny McLean, City Convener for Neighbourhoods, Housing and Public Realm at Glasgow City Council, said: “Glasgow’s Canal has witnessed a remarkable transformation over the past decade, with many people and a host of cultural, sporting and regeneration organisations calling the area home.  The release of this final tranche of the Great Space Scheme funding will allow the fantastic heritage potential of the canal to be more fully realised, and continue the regeneration of the canal corridor and the wider North Glasgow area.”

The new Planning Enforcement Charter for Glasgow was approved by the city council today (6 February).

 

While the power to take enforcement action is discretionary, local authorities – through the Planning Etc. (Scotland) Act 2006 – must provide a publicly available document (the Charter) explaining not only their approach to dealing with breaches of planning control, but also how the enforcement system works, how the public can raise complaints about alleged breaches of planning control, the role of the planning authority and the service standards it sets itself.

 

The Planning Etc. (Scotland) Act 2006 Act requires a new Charter to be produced every two years, taking into consideration any changes in legislation that may have occurred throughout the duration of the previous Charter. The most significant change in this period was the Planning (Scotland) Act 2019 passed by the Scottish Parliament in June 2019.   The new Act guides the future structure of the modernised planning system and will include measures to strengthen planning enforcement.

 

Increases in fines for non-compliance with effective enforcement notices came into place from 20 December 2019 onwards as well the potential for fines to take into account financial benefits accrued as a consequence of the breach.  Nevertheless, some changes have been made to the Charter in anticipation of requirements that will come in through the lifespan of the 2020-2022 Planning Enforcement Charter.

 

The Charter is revised to be more user-friendly, splitting the enforcement process into two main parts, the first being the separation of what can and what cannot be dealt with in relation to enforcement powers.  Upon establishing that there is a remit for planning enforcement, the second part of the process explains how stakeholders should engage with the service, advising what information is crucial and/or helpful at the initiation of an investigation, and what stakeholders may expect thereafter in terms of service standards.

 

The current Charter has introduced Planning Impact Reports, which underpin confidence in the enforcement service through providing a formal way of assessing unauthorized  development and providing a greater degree of certainty regarding the direction of the case.  In doing so, they remove minor breaches from the system at an earlier stage, helping channel resources to where enforcement action is necessary.

 

In November 2019, Glasgow City Council’s Planning Enforcement team received an award at the Scottish Government’s 20th Annual Scottish Awards in Quality Planning for introducing Planning Impact Reports into its processes.

 

Councillor Kenny McLean, City Convener for Neighbourhoods, Housing and Public Realm at Glasgow City Council, said: “The city’s new Planning Enforcement Charter will both make our enforcement powers more effective, and explain more clearly rights and responsibilities for everyone with an interest.  This is an important step in ensuring that work without planning consent does not take place in Glasgow.”

 

The Charter will now be submitted to the Scottish Government for approval.

 

Glasgow’s Planning Enforcement Charter will be made available at all public libraries and at the offices of the council’s Development and Regeneration Services at 231 George Street.

George Square Conversation

Glasgow City Council has now approved the beginning of work on a design strategy and traffic reconfiguration at George Square, the city’s civic centre and principal urban space.

George Square Conversation

A recent public engagement on the use and future use of the square reinforced the results of similar exercises, and found that the people of Glasgow want more greening, trees and flowers; less traffic and parking; good quality and accessible events; a permanently available public space where people can meet, sit, protest and walk through; and a high quality in design – with public engagement in that design.

 

Today’s approval means that the traffic plan for George Square will be developed as part of the emerging City Centre Transport Strategy, and the statutory process on a new traffic layout to be delivered before the European Championships in June 2020 will begin.  The proposed new layout will involve full closure (or pedestrianisation) of the east and west sides, while north and south will be public transport corridors.  All parking will be removed, and these changes will be enabled through temporary measures like signage and street furniture.

 

The design strategy for George Square – to be achieved through the Avenues programme – will begin in late 2020, when the design team is in place.  The project scope will include Hanover Street and Miller Street, aiming to create a new pedestrian link from Queen Street Station through George Square down to Argyle Street and the Clyde.

 

Glasgow’s hosting of major events in 2020 including the UEFA European Championships and COP 26 – and more in the next few years – has led to the phasing of the redevelopment of the square, with construction works likely to begin after the UCI Cycling World Championships in the summer of 2023.

 

The delivery of the redeveloped George Square will be part of the wider Avenues programme in the city centre, with the design, quality and consistency of both projects are aligned, so the project scope with include the George Street and St Vincent Street Avenues as well as the square.

 

The estimated cost for the proposed George Square works is between £8million – £10million, with the proposed works at Hanover Street and Miller Street estimated at £2 – £3million.  These costs will be met from existing capital budgets, including the Glasgow City Region City Deal.

 

The works will be procured and governed as part of the Avenue’s ‘Block C’ (covering George Square, George Street, Hanover Street, Hope Street, IFSD West, John Street, Miller Street, St Vincent Place and St Vincent Street) design contract, which is going out to tender in April with a contract appointment expected in October this year.

 

There will also be a need for a sustainable solution to the interface between George Square and Queen Street Station, to ensure necessary accessibility and servicing requirements with appropriate public transport and active travel facilities and infrastructure.  The scope of works for all the work around the square will be established as the design process progresses, with detail to be developed through a further process of intensive analysis and public engagement.

 

The design process for the redevelopment of the square responds to the global climate emergency in a number of ways, including the introduction of green infrastructure; tackling poor air quality; promoting and prioritising active travel and public transport; using SMART infrastructure to make this city centre neighbourhood resilient and sustainable; and mitigating against the possible impacts of climate change through surface water management.

 

It is recognised that in all phases of the project that there will be challenges with regards to servicing of various shops, businesses, residential developments, refuse collection facilities, etc.  Local access for residents will still be maintained.  These issues will be fully considered in due course, and appropriate mitigation measures put in place.

 

The design process for the square will include further public engagement as options are developed, proactively consulting with vulnerable user groups and other key stakeholders

 

The delivery of the George Square Area Strategy project will be monitored by a cross-party group which will review the project as it develops.

 

Councillor Susan Aitken, Leader of Glasgow City Council, said: “We can now begin work on the redevelopment of George Square to deliver the changes that the people of Glasgow have told us they want.  Throughout this process, we will continue to engage with everyone with a stake in the square to create a civic space we can all enjoy and be proud of.”

 

Images of how George Square may look after the first phase of redevelopment are available on request.

Potential partners in a pioneering Alliance to End Homelessness are revealed in a report going before Glasgow councillors on February 6th.

Third and independent sector organisations teamed up to bid to become partners in a ground-breaking Alliance to End Homelessness in the city. Bids from two groups were received for the contract which is worth more than £187million over a maximum of 10 years.

Glasgow – Everyone’s Home group has been named as the preferred bidder to work with the city council to transform the planning, design and delivery of homelessness services in the city. Seven organisations – Aspire, Crossreach, Loretto Care, Mungo Foundation, Sacro, Salvation Army and YPeople – make up the group.

The council will retain sole responsibility for statutory homelessness services and be a member of the Alliance which will make financial and operational decisions on the provision of “purchased services” such as street and community outreach services, Housing First provision, emergency and supported accommodation, day services and specific outreach support for young people aged over 16 years.

Councillor Mhairi Hunter, Glasgow’s Convener for Health & Social Care, said: “Glasgow’s Alliance to End Homelessness will be the first of its kind. It is an ambitious and innovative approach to partnership working and offers a significant opportunity to demonstrate that by pooling our resources, skills and considerable expertise, we can deliver our shared ambitions for the transformation of homelessness services.

“Currently homelessness services in the city are quite traditional and, although there is already partnership working, services can sometimes be provided in silos. The Alliance will provide a more inclusive and collaborative approach to service provision and decision-making. It will create more flexible and adaptable services which can react faster to changing demands to help prevent homelessness, end rough sleeping and help people integrate into communities when they move out of temporary accommodation and into their own permanent tenancies.”

Work to establish the Alliance has been ongoing since 2016 when a review highlighted the need to modernise services. People with lived or personal experience of homelessness were involved throughout the development process and will continue to be involved in the work of the Alliance.

A Director will be appointed to lead the Alliance which will have a budget of £23million in its first year. For the first two years, the council, will also provide a further £100,000 annually in set-up costs.

Susanne Millar, Interim Chief Officer of Glasgow’s Health & Social Care Partnership, said: “The Alliance represents real cultural and whole-system change in the provision of homelessness services. It is about true collaboration – the decision-making will be shared and it will bring together considerable expertise to provide person-centred services. It will increase access to settled accommodation and support people to sustain their tenancies – reducing the cycle of repeat homelessness as well as addressing rough sleeping.”

The report will be considered by council’s Contracts & Property Committee on February 6th. It can be viewed here

George Square Conversation

A Glasgow City Council committee today (28 January) considered the findings of the recent public engagement on the future use and design of George Square, the city’s civic centre and principal urban space.

George Square Conversation

The city-wide Public Conversation about George Square – which focused on how people use the square, what they think about it, what it means to the city, and the ambitions people have for it – saw 2,267 submissions received in October/November 2019.  The engagement was carried out online – the website used to host online parts of the conversation was viewed almost 8,000 times – and through surveys at city libraries, workshops, vox pops and other events.

 

The Conversation confirmed that the people of Glasgow feel that change is required at George Square, while respecting its history and the aspects of the square that remain valued.

George Square Conversation

The key themes of the findings from the Conversation – the brief for which was framed by the City Urbanist – include: a reduction in traffic or an element of pedestrianisation; a more sustainable / green space; a place to sit or relax; a mixed response to statues (ranging from retained, altered in layout and removed to new statues, cleaning and conservation); a water feature, fountain or pond.

 

These themes align with previous consultations in 2017 and 2018 on the future of the square, which also called for less traffic; more greening and sustainability; retaining a permanently accessible public space for passing through, sitting, gathering and demonstrating; a managed event strategy as part of a wider city centre event space plan; design quality and public involvement in design.

 

It is proposed – given the clear consensus on the need to reduce traffic – that the preferred option for traffic at George Square is the eventual full pedestrianisation of the east and west sides, with public transport and cycling corridors on the north and south side. This proposed objective would see a reconfigured traffic layout – including the removal of parking – that would be delivered preferably by the summer of 2020.

 

This option would involve temporary features and facilities, with permanent public realm and road infrastructure works to be progressed after summer 2023, when the square will be used for the UCI Cycling Championships. It should be noted that the final confirmation of the traffic arrangements on the square will be shaped by the emerging City Centre Transport Strategy.

 

In terms of the people of Glasgow’s ambitions for the square, the findings of the conversation showed the desire for it to be a place for sightseeing the buildings or monuments, with grass, trees and flowers – an open space to relax, meet or socialise.

 

The delivery of the redeveloped George Square is proposed to be part of the wider Avenues programme in the city centre, with the design, quality and consistency of both projects are aligned, so the project scope with include the George Street and St Vincent Street Avenues as well as the square.  In addition, the intention is to create a high-quality pedestrian connection and public realm on Hanover Street and Millar Street to connect the Argyle Street and St Vincent Street Avenues.

 

The estimated cost for the proposed George Square works is between £8million – £10million, with the proposed works at Hanover Street and Miller Street estimated at £2 – £3million.  These costs will be met from existing capital budgets, including the Glasgow City Region City Deal.

 

The works will be procured and governed as part of the Avenue’s ‘Block C’ (covering George Square, George Street, Hanover Street, Hope Street, IFSD West, John Street, Miller Street, St Vincent Place and St Vincent Street) design contract, which is going out to tender in April with a contract appointment expected in October this year.  The wider design of Block C, and the concept design for George Square will be the responsibility of the external contractors, with detailed and technical design for George Square undertaken by Glasgow City Council.

 

There will also be a need for a sustainable solution to the interface between George Square and Queen Street Station, to ensure necessary accessibility and servicing requirements with appropriate public transport and active travel facilities and infrastructure.  The scope of works for all the work around the square will be established as the design process progresses, with detail to be developed through a further process of intensive analysis and public engagement.

 

The design process for the redevelopment of the square responds to the global climate emergency in a number of ways, including the introduction of green infrastructure; tackling poor air quality; promoting and prioritising active travel and public transport; using SMART infrastructure to make this city centre neighbourhood resilient and sustainable; and mitigating against the possible impacts of climate change through surface water management.

 

It is proposed that the delivery of this, the George Square Area Strategy project, will be monitored by a cross-party group which will review the project as it develops.

 

Councillor Susan Aitken, Leader of Glasgow City Council, said: “The consultation findings echo what our citizens routinely tell us, that something clearly has to change with George Square.  I’m really encouraged that there is consensus on many key elements. The public conversations we have facilitated tell us our people want a greener square with less traffic, a space of high design quality and which continues to function as it traditionally has done, as a space for Glaswegians to gather.  Our task now is to respond to that, respecting the Square’s history and place in Glasgow life whilst delivering a civic space which is both attractive and cherished and reflects our status as a European city.”

 

The recommendations from the report will now go the council’s City Administration Committee on 6 February where consideration will be given for approval to proceed.

 

Images of how George Square may look after the first phase of redevelopment are available on request.

glasgow film office wwz

Glasgow City Council’s Glasgow Film Office (GFO) helped to generate almost £12.5million for the city’s economy in 2019, though film, broadcast and advertising productions attracted to the city by their activity.

glasgow film office wwz

Since its creation in 1997 with the aim of promoting Glasgow as a ‘film-friendly’ city, the GFO has attracted productions that have generated over £320million in economic activity.

 

2019 saw a number of notable productions film in Glasgow, including the award-winning 1917 and Succession, BBC dramas GuiltElizabeth Is Missing (starring Glenda Jackson) and the yet to broadcast The Nest (starring Martin Compston and Sophie Rundle), as well as Bollywood features Saach and 1983.

 

These productions join a long list of major films and broadcast series made in Glasgow, including World War ZUnder The SkinOutlaw KingThe Wife, Hobbs & ShawWild RoseOutlanderStill Game, The Replacement and The Cry.

 

The GFO – the council’s film commission – acts as a ‘one-stop shop’ for productions of all sizes and budgets filming or wishing to film in Glasgow, coordinating meetings with appropriate agencies, location owners and council departments.  This ensures that filming goes as smoothly as possible, delivering the greatest economic impact and minimising the impact on the daily life and operations of residents and businesses.

 

The GFO also markets Glasgow as an attractive filming location through supporting recces for production and location teams, meetings with key producers and decision makers, and working with Screen Scotland in the planning and execution of joint marketing activities.  A grant is also given to productions hiring local facilities and services suppliers, to help support and develop the sector in the city.

 

The GFO leads the Glasgow Film Partnership, a body with over 60 members, with the common goal of making filming on location in the city as simple as possible.  Some of the members of this partnership include Glasgow Chamber of Commerce, Glasgow Science Centre, the University of Glasgow, Glasgow Airport, Network Rail and SPT.

 

Councillor Susan Aitken, Leader of Glasgow City Council, said: Councillor Susan Aitken, Leader of Glasgow City Council, said: “These latest figures point to the continuing attraction of Glasgow as location for film production and, crucially, the successes of the council’s Film Office in facilitating that. Major productions like 1917 and Succession not only generate significant economy activity within the city but they profile what Glasgow has to offer to the film and broadcast industry, from our locations to our crews and facilities.  The Glasgow Film Office team are pivotal to making all this happen, while minimising the impact on our residents and businesses.  This approach has been so successful that I am sure we can look forward to hearing some super news about more major productions coming to Glasgow in the very near future.”

 

The film and broadcast sector has paid tribute to the help given to productions in Glasgow in the past, and below are just some examples:

 

Tom Asquith, Location Manager, Fast & Furious: Hobbs and Shaw: “All who we dealt with in the city were enthusiastic and positive about the feasibility of our plans.  I was overwhelmed by the patience, support and the welcome we received from the residents of Glasgow.” 

 

Piers Tempest, Producer, The Wife and Churchill: “Glasgow is a fantastically diverse city to film in. Our experience from filming both The Wife and Churchill in Glasgow was excellent, and the support the Glasgow Film Office was extremely helpful, and echoed the welcome that the city gave us.”                               

 

David Brown, Scottish Line Producer, Cloud Atlas and Producer, Outlander: “The principle reason for coming to Glasgow is the welcome that the city gives to filmmakers. We are overwhelmed by the support and encouragement we have received from everyone in the city.”

Glasgow City Council is set to embark upon a major project to improve the ground conditions at Bellahouston Park to protect the park for use by the general public and also as an events space.

Following the wettest August on record last year, the part of Bellahouston Park used for events was closed off to the public due to flooding and damage to the ground. The intended works will cover the date for the Hella Mega Tour with Green Day, Fall Out Boy and Weezer on June 24 and also two other events which are still to be announced by music promoters, DF Concerts.

Glasgow Green will now play host to these events in June while the groundworks are being completed at Bellahouston Park. Details on the two other concerts will be announced in due course by DF Concerts.

A spokesman for the council said: “Our plans for Bellahouston Park will significantly improve the ground conditions within the park. The natural landscape within the park creates a bowl-effect where water can collect. But our investigations also identified high levels of clay and silt just under the surface, which affects the speed at which rain water can drain away.

“It is intended that the improvements will channel rain water away from the previously affected area. The interventions will help to ensure the impact of any events within the park is greatly minimised, which will improve its amenity for park users. But it will also provide confidence that the park will remain as an attractive and reliable events space.

“While this work is underway, three concerts initially planned for Bellahouston Park by DF Concerts will take place at Glasgow Green. We will be engaging with the local community around Glasgow Green as part of the multi-agency group that supports the delivery of major outdoor events within the city.”

A Community Drop-in Session has been confirmed to take place at Saint Luke’s venue on Bain Street on 19th February, 5pm-7:30pm. Residents living close to Glasgow Green will have the opportunity to come along and chat to representatives from DF Concerts, the event traffic, security, and noise management teams, as well as representatives from Police Scotland and Glasgow City Council, about the planning of the events.

DF Concerts will be running a local resident ticket ballot for the shows that are taking place at Glasgow Green in June. All residents who live within the local vicinity of Glasgow Green will receive information on this from DF Concerts in due course.

The work to Bellahouston Park is scheduled to be completed in time for the Glasgow Summer Sessions concerts to go ahead at the end of August.

DF Concerts will ensure all ticket buyers for the Hella Mega Tour are made aware of the change of venue. DF Concerts has also indicated that ticket buyers don’t need to take any action as they will still receive their tickets closer to the event.