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SCHOOL CAR FREE ZONES TO BE TRIALLED IN GLASGOW

no-car-sign

Car free zones are set to be trialled at seven Glasgow primary schools in a bid to improve road safety for children.

The scheme would see temporary pedestrian areas created outside the seven schools for limited periods in the morning and afternoon to help ensure pupils can arrive and leave school safely.

no-car-sign

The push for the pilot programme follows a series of concerns such as poor and risky driving outside schools, obstructive parking that forces pupils on to the road as well as the issues created by congestion and harmful emissions.

The proposals for streets around Bankhead, Broomhill, Hillhead, Lourdes, Our Lady of the Rosary, St Blane’s and Toryglen primary schools are currently being consulted upon by the council. Views are being sought from the council’s Education Services, head teachers, parent councils, community councils, elected members, Police Scotland and other members of the community.

The schools chosen for the pilot have a history of complaints and concerns from parent councils, community council and elected members about pupil safety on the school run.  But there is evidence that the schools earmarked for involvement in the scheme experience high levels of car use for the school journey and also have to deal with acute congestion at the school gates.

The eligibility for involvement in the scheme also considers the school’s location on the road network – the school entrance shouldn’t open on to a bus route for instance. But also that there should be reasonable scope for the surrounding area to cope with displaced traffic.

Councillor Chris Cunningham, City Convenor for Education, Skills and Early Years, said calls from the affected communities for a safer environment outside schools have driven forward the plans for school car free zones.

Councillor Cunningham said: “There is a public demand from parents and residents to make sure children are as safe as possible when heading to and from school.  A number of initiatives have already tried to clamp down on poor driver behaviour, but problems that put children at risk still persist.

“In the circumstances we have to go one step further to protect our children.  Car free zones outside schools can create safe spaces for young people at key points of the school day.  The zones are being introduced on a trial basis and we will be looking very carefully at the evidence to see how effective they prove to be.”

Councillor Anna Richardson, City Convenor for Sustainability and Carbon Reduction, backed the pilot programme and hoped it would encourage more pupils to take an active travel option to get to school.

Councillor Richardson said: “We must ensure our young people are as active as possible as a way to tackle the ever increasing problem of childhood obesity. Creating a safer, more pleasant environment for children to walk and cycle to school can absolutely play a part in promoting a healthier lifestyle for young people.

“Unfortunately, Glasgow currently has the highest rate of pupils being driven to school compared to the other cities in Scotland.  This amount of traffic heading to the school clearly impacts on the wider environment and creates road safety risks at the school gate. School car free zones will keep streets around schools clear of cars at the busiest times of the school day. We hope school car free zones will give parents greater confidence that their children can walk or cycle to school safely every day.”

A starting date for the school car free zones has still to be confirmed. It is anticipated that the trial period will last for up to 18 months.

Indicators for the success of the project will include a reduction in congestion and speed of traffic around school gates and increase in the number of children walking and cycling to school alongside a reduction in the number of car trips to school.

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Appeal for families of men who died during Cyprus Emergency

Cyprus Emergency Peace Keeping Force

An appeal is being made to trace relatives of men killed serving in the Cyprus Emergency Peace Keeping Force – often referred to as the ‘Forgotten Conflict’

It follows the most recent award of the Elizabeth Cross to two affected families by Glasgow’s Lord Provost Eva Bolander, in her capacity as Lord Lieutenant, late last year.

Cyprus Emergency Peace Keeping Force

The Lord Provost said: “It’s important that families receive recognition of their loved- one’s service. Conflict visits great costs on everyone who loses a member of their family. It’s my privilege and pleasure to be able to present these Elizabeth Crosses. I know it’s a source of great pride and comfort to those left behind.”

James McManus (74), the brother of Leading Aircraftman Joseph McManus (19); and Robert Boyle Mathieson (60), the son of Private James Boyle (21), proudly accepted the medals and spoke poignantly of their loss and grief at a special ceremony held in the City Chambers last November.

The men were killed in separate road traffic accidents while deployed on that island mission. Joseph on 18 May 1956 near Nicosia and James on 17 November 1958 in Nicosia. They are buried at Wayne’s Keep, the British Military Cemetery, in Cyprus.

James recalled the shock of learning of his big brother’s death. “I was out in the back garden playing. I remember seeing my mother at the back door crying with a Telegram in her hand.

“Unfortunately the way things were in these days your parents didn’t tell you anything. I was just told he was dead. It was hard as an 11 year old to take in. It’s great to be here today after so long.”

Joseph, known as Joe, was born on 11 March 1937 to Peter and Annie McManus from Blantyre. His siblings: Ann, Margaret, Kathleen, Christine and James.

He was educated in Motherwell and Bishops Waltham before enlisting with the RAF on 10 June 1955 aged 18 years. Following completion of his basic training at RAF Hednesford in Staffordshire, he was posted to RAF Weeton in Lancashire. There he passed his trade tests qualifying him as an Aircraftman 1st Class in engine mechanics in November 1955.

Joe was assigned to 103 Maintenance Unit at RAF Akrotiri, Cyprus on 21 December 1955 to support the RAF’s Middle and Far East operations. He was also regularly detached to the island’s other air base at Nicosia.

Bases that would become increasingly strategically important as the British Air Force pulled out of Egypt and converged on Cyprus.

Robert, the son of Pte Boyle, was less than six months old when his father died. He grew up knowing nothing about him. His mother Margaret, known as Greta, remarried. Robert took the name Mathieson as an infant. His stepdad was Alex Mathieson and the family lived in Castlemilk and Bridgeton.

Robert remembers coming across the Telegram about his dad’s death, when he was around four years old. However, no-one spoke about him. It was only by chance, listening to the radio, he learned about the Cyprus Emergency Peace Keeping Force and heard his father’s name. Allowing him to finally piece together fragments of his past.

Robert also revealed he’d only recently found out his father had brothers and sisters: Margaret, Elle, Mary, Dominic, Thomas, Henry and Francis. The children of John and Elizabeth Boyle.

Robert, who runs the Kilt Centre in Hamilton, said: “This medal is the catalyst to continue my investigations into my father’s past. I’m looking forward to finding out more”.

Pte Boyle was born in October 1935 and joined up aged 21 years. He was posted to 5 Training Battalion, Blenheim Barracks, Aldershot, for basic training in February 1957.

And later assigned to the 42nd Company, Royal Army Service Corps, 1st Transport Column deployed to Cyprus.

Les Smith (80) from Lancashire, who also served in Cyprus, with the Royal Horse Guards (The Blues), is trying to track down relatives of the 372 young men who died during the 1955 to 1959 Emergency. Including 47 men who came from Scotland.

He’s seeking the next of kin of:

Pte George Cullen (18), from Glasgow. Served with the Highland Light Infantry. Killed in an accident on 8 June 1956.

Driver James Duncan Neil (19), from Glasgow. Served with the RAS. Died in an accident on 25 September 1956. Body returned home for burial

Sgt Alexander Stuart Sutton (39) from Kelvingrove, Glasgow. Served with the RAF. Died in an accident on 27 May 1956.

Cpl George Fergusson (20) from Govan, Glasgow. Served with RAF Nicosia. Died on 27 March 1959.

If you can help Les please contact him at cyprusveterans@gmail.com

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Action Plan to tackle anti-social behaviour

glasgow central station

Glasgow City Council is inviting hundreds of businesses in the city centre to help shape a new action plan to tackle anti-social behaviour around central station.

Letters are being sent to around 500 businesses in Argyle Street, Hope Street, Renfield Lane and Union Street outlining a joint approach to address anti-social activity through partnership working.

glasgow central station

A series of meetings have already taken place following concerns raised by businesses and now, the council, project partners (including British Transport Police and Police Scotland) are drawing up an Action Plan in coordination with a range of agencies and support organisations.

Councillor Allan Casey said: “Glasgow has a vibrant city centre which attracts a high number of people. Like many other cities, issues can arise and these can impact how people use and perceive the city centre.

“Our plan is to co-ordinate the relevant services to tackle unacceptable behaviour taking place around Central Station and the surrounding areas.  We want to promote and encourage positive activities instead, such as events, for the benefit of local businesses, residents and visitors.

“We remain committed to working with our partners to target problematic areas and keep people safe. Having local businesses on board will help immensely.”

Businesses along Argyle Street, Hope Street, Renfield Lane and Union Street are being invited to help introduce a joined up approach to tackling anti-social activity.

Cllr Casey added: “It’s important that the businesses become involved in this initiative.  We can’t do it alone. Their input is vital.”

Further information on the work undertaken by the council’s City Centre Regeneration is available here: https://www.glasgowcitycentrestrategy.com

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River Park on the Clyde among plans council considering for Broomielaw regeneration

Plans for the regeneration of Broomielaw, a historic area in Glasgow city centre on the north bank of the Clyde that is key to the further regeneration of both the city centre and the River Clyde corridor, were today (7 February) considered by Glasgow City Council.

 

The plans include a proposal for a world-class River Park along both banks of the Clyde; an examination of the benefits and negative impacts of the M8 motorway on the area; establishing a vibrant mixed-use riverfront community featuring high-quality contemporary design; creating new public and green spaces; and instilling a collaborative approach to attracting investment and funding.

 

A public consultation on these plans – which will be delivered through the Broomielaw District Regeneration Framework, currently at draft stage – will begin on 8 February.

 

Broomielaw is an area with notable existing strengths, such as the successful International Financial Services District; its status as a strategic and highly accessible location which acts as a gateway between the city centre and destinations such as the SEC Campus, Glasgow Airport, the city’s West End and South Side; and its tremendous potential in the form of increasing developer activity and interest which may lead to a growing population in the area.

 

Challenges remain in Broomielaw, with few quality public spaces, sparse and piecemeal residential development, the M8 separates the district from the West End, and the area has an under-developed night-time economy and is heavily car-dominated.  In addition, parts of the riverside in the area are an under-utilised asset that must be addressed to attract investment and development.

 

The Broomielaw district is one of nine in Glasgow city centre identified through the council’s City Centre Strategy, with each of these districts to have its own strategy and District Regeneration Frameworks (DRFs) that would see it taking a distinct role in making a more sustainable, mixed-use city centre.

 

The first of these districts to have such a strategy – essentially a 10-year regeneration plan – was the Sauchiehall and Garnethill District whose DRF was developed over 18 months with significant community and stakeholder engagement. This district features the first Avenues project in the city, the Sauchiehall Avenue, funded by the Glasgow City Region City Deal, which will be complete this year.

 

The Broomielaw District Regeneration Framework (BDRF) is the second DRF for the city centre, and has been developed collaboratively by a multi-disciplinary team led by Austin Smith Lord and MVRDV, working with the local community, businesses, owners, developers, investors and other stakeholders and organisations.  The consultation period between 9 February and 5 April will offer a further opportunity to help shape the plans, after which the final Broomielaw DRF and Action Plan will be produced.

 

The draft Broomielaw DRF contains a number of recommendations and proposals, with an understanding that resource constraints will limit what actions are taken forward, with this being guided by identified priorities.  The final action plan for the DRF will reflect actions that are deliverable in funding, resource and outcome terms.

 

Seven strategic themes have been developed for the BDRF and associated draft action plan:

 

  • (Y)our River Park: this is a proposal to create a world-class linear public space along both banks of the River Clyde.  This continuous urban park would transform the river, kick-start development and become a key destination and attraction in the city centre.  The aim is to create a quality urban park amenity characterised by water, green and public spaces activate by event and play spaces, recreation and cultural activity for all ages in all seasons, all weather, all day, for all Glaswegians and visitors;

 

  • (Y)our Urbanised M8: this aims to maintain the benefits of an urban motorway while reducing its negative impacts.  Many consultees have highlighted the convenience and connectivity benefits of the motorway, however the majority of consultees recognised its negative impact – separating neighbourhoods, creating a physical barrier between the city centre, and its West End and North, and exacerbating the area’s pollution and traffic congestion.  Anderston Cross is an unpleasant experience for pedestrians and cyclists.

 

  • (Y)our Great Streets and Spaces: this theme seeks to respond to the car-dominated character of the district and address the shortage of quality green and public spaces. Broken connections need to be addressed throughout the district and investment in public spaces and the physical environment is essential.

 

  • (Y)our Great Buildings: this theme promotes actions to respect Glasgow’s historic built heritage with the highest quality contemporary design.  Clear guidance about the desired qualities of new design will assist development, and the BDRF promotes the development of character-specific areas with an emphasis on pedestrian and cyclist accessibility.

 

  • (Y)our Updated Mobility: this incorporates proposals to enhance the city centre’s public transport and active travel networks to create a sustainable, walkable city, and will include a review of the City Centre Transport Strategy in the context of the BDRF objectives and the recommendations of the Connectivity Commission;

 

  • (Y)our Vibrant Broomielaw: this theme proposes the establishment of a lively, attractive mixed-use riverfront district and a significant uplift in the residential population so that the area becomes more lively, with more night-time economy, leading to more viable amenities and a sustainable, walkable and activated district;

 

  • (Y)our Transforming Broomielaw: this focuses on the creation of agile policies and shared objectives to attract investment, secure funding and foster collaborative working in the district.  Transforming this district cannot however be delivered by the council alone; this must be a truly collaborative partnership between all stakeholders.  Despite the lack of public ownership, GCC will look to work with partners to develop masterplan strategies for both sides of the river.

 

The Broomielaw DRF will become Supplementary Planning Guidance once it and the city centre Strategic Development Framework is approved by the council.  This will allow it to have the status of a material consideration, and it will be referenced and used to make development decisions in the district.  The BDRF Planning Policy section provides the context for the Broomielaw district, and provides criteria against which development proposals will be assessed.

 

The council’s GCC City Centre Regeneration Team will ensure that there is a way for residents and other stakeholders to continue to be involved and input to the process as projects are developed and delivered.  Engagement is ongoing with the Blythswood and Broomielaw community council.

 

Councillor Susan Aitken, Leader of Glasgow City Council, said: “These ambitious plans will help the council and our partners to bring Broomielaw to its full potential and allow the area to take its proper place in the life of the city.  This is a part of Glasgow that has enormous scope to influence the future development of the city centre and the river corridor, so please take the opportunity to help shape the final plans by taking part in the consultation on the Broomielaw District Regeneration Framework.”

 

The draft Broomielaw District Regeneration Framework can be found at: https://www.glasgowcitycentrestrategy.com/broomielaw-district-regeneration-framework-public-consultation.htm.

 

The public consultation, which will take the form of an online survey, or comments by email or post, can be found at the city council’s Consultation Hub at:  https://www.glasgow.gov.uk/index.aspx?articleid=17317 from 8 February.

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Council approves new strategy to make best use of its property and land estate

Glasgow City Council today (7 February) approved a Property and Land Strategy which will guide how the council makes the best use of its substantial property and land estate, the biggest in the city.  The possible relocation of council offices from the city centre to key regeneration areas across Glasgow is one action being considered through the strategy.

 

The strategy will help improve services to communities, reduce public costs and raisie income for the council, increase community engagement and regenerate neighbourhoods across the city over the next decade.

 

The council has more than 1,000 operational properties, including schools and nurseries, care homes, offices, community and sports centres, museums, galleries and libraries, as well as surplus property and land.

 

The size of this estate means that it plays a significant role in the life of the city, helping neighbourhoods throughout Glasgow thrive, and the council is committed to working with local communities to rethink how these are used to ensure that – in an era of challenging finances for local authorities – its facilities are fit for purpose; solutions are found to protect our built heritage; derelict sites are restored to productive use; and that ownership is opened up to other groups and organisations where appropriate and possible.

 

The possible relocation of some council offices from the city centre to regeneration areas in various parts of the city would allow not only more effective delivery of council services but also act as a catalyst for the social and economic regeneration of local communities.  Locating council offices or facilities in particular areas plays a key role in attracting investment, development and creating local employment opportunities.

 

The council will also work with community groups, public agencies and third sector organisations to ensure that services meet local needs and priorities, and the Property and Land Strategy will inform how these needs and priorities are best met through the council’s estate through measures such as co-location and investment in / repurposing of sites.

 

Councillor Kenny McLean, City Convener for Neighbourhoods, Housing and Public Realm at Glasgow City Council, said: “Over the next decade, the adoption of the council’s Property and Land Strategy will mean our estate will be used more efficiently and effectively, with the people of Glasgow more closely involved and better served.  The council will also have reduced costs in the years ahead, as well as the ability to raise capital receipts to help deliver improved public services in the city.  The proper location of these services will aid the regeneration of neighbourhoods throughout Glasgow, and deliver real, inclusive economic growth.”

 

Three complementary asset plans will support the Property and Land Strategy: the Community Asset Plan; the Built Heritage Plan; and the Vacant and Derelict Land Plan.  The first of these reflects the council’s commitment to the greater involvement and empowerment of our citizens; the second provides a consistent and considered approach to the stewardship of the council’s built heritage; and the third addresses the potential blight, cost and missed opportunity that vacant and derelict properties and land can represent for the council and the city.

 

The council’s Property and Land Strategy, approved at today’s City Administration Committee, has five key objectives driving the approach to the use of, and investment in, its property and land estate between 2019 – 2022:

 

  • A more efficient, sustainable, smaller, and better quality estate;
  • An agile estate capable of meeting current and future service delivery needs;
  • Collaborating and co-locating with community planning partners, third sector organisations and city region partners;
  • Achieving cost reductions, increasing income and generating capital receipts; and
  • Embracing digital and technological innovation to reduce reliance on and improve the performance of the estate.

 

In order to achieve these objectives, a number of actions are being considered, including the relocation of city centre offices to support regeneration through the identification of suitable locations owned by the council or its partners in key regeneration districts, and planning for a phased withdrawal from these higher-cost city centre locations.  Such action would reduce public costs and increase local employment opportunities in these districts.

 

Another potential action being recommended is the development of multi-service/multi-agency community hubs across the city, which will allow greater community involvement and greater effectiveness and efficiency in service delivery.  Additionally, multi-service operation hubs will be established to increase collaborative and co-operative working; deliver economies of scale and raise capital receipts through the sale of released sites.

 

The council will also work with communities to co-design future delivery needs, with local communities being directly involved in local sites.  Communities will also be given the opportunity to take over the ownership and management of community assets through Community Asset Transfer.

 

Where council properties are of particular cultural or heritage importance, an innovative approach to their management and purpose will be taken, with plans put it in place – working with local and national heritage bodies – to maintain and protect these buildings and put them to productive use where appropriate.

 

The strategy will also repurpose the council’s under-occupied and surplus properties through identification of those properties which will be developed in the long-term and those which can be marketed, and this will reduce costs, raise capital receipts and allow regeneration by both the public and private sectors.

 

The final action of the strategy will be to ensure that future investment in council property minimises environmental impact and establishes affordable life-cycle maintenance through whole-life financial modelling and adapting low-carbon technologies, delivering reduced repair costs and a leaner, greener estate.

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10,000 Families to benefit from more free early learning and childcare

More than 10,000 families across the city could be in line to benefit from more free and fully funded early learning and childcare (ELC) in Glasgow’s nurseries following an agreement and cross party support at today’s City Administration Committee today – Thursday 7 February.

Glasgow families earning up to £45,000 will now be offered 900 hours of free ELC provision for three and four year olds from August 2019 – an additional 300 hours of their current statutory entitlement.

Partner providers will also be able to offer this should they wish.

This is an increase of the current household threshold of £30,000 introduced by the City Government last year as the council works towards rolling out the Scottish Government’s national commitment of  1140hrs fully funded early learning expansion plans for all 3 and 4 year olds and eligible 2 year olds by August 2020.

The committee report also outlines the council’s commitment to our valued partner providers by announcing the new commissioning rate – an increase of 54% to £5.40 per hour which will be available from August 2019.

This will help partners as they make their own phasing plans for the introduction of 1140hrs by August 2020.

Councillor Chris Cunningham, City Convener for Education, Skills & Early Years said: “This proposal will mean more fully funded early learning and childcare hours for thousands of our families and will be a big help towards the monthly bills in a time when everyone is feeling the pinch.

“I’m delighted that our proposal received cross party support at today’s City Administration Committee – we predict that from August as many as 10,000 Glasgow families will benefit with more access to a quality, flexible and affordable early years’ service.

“I’m also delighted to announce, as we work towards a phased introduction of 1140 fully funded hours for all 3 and 4 year olds and eligible 2 year olds, the council’s new sustainable partner provider rate.

“This will hopefully bring reassurance to our valued partners that we are committed to continue to work together to deliver in Glasgow’s quality early learning and childcare settings.”

Children’s Minister Maree Todd said: “It’s fantastic to see Glasgow City Council striding ahead and increasing the number of funded early learning and childcare hours to 900 hours from this August for the vast majority of families with 3 and 4 year olds in the city.  This means more children will receive high quality childcare city-wide before they’ve even set foot in school and parents and carers will enjoy more choice and flexibility across the private, public and voluntary sectors.

“International research has proven that universally accessible and high quality early years education helps to provide children with skills and confidence to carry into school.  I look forward to seeing these positive changes to children’s lives as a result of Glasgow’s early roll-out.”

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Council Agrees to buy legacy Hub in Dalmarnock

Glasgow city council today (07 February 2019) agreed to exercise its right of pre-emption over The Legacy Hub, in Dalmarnock, meaning that it can buy back the former council-owned land and Hub building from Administrators.

In 2014, the council and a number of other funders supporting a new community initiative, sold the land for the construction of the Hub to the People’s Development Trust (PDT) for a nominal sum of £1.

As the council was not selling the land for commercial value it created a right of pre-emption, effectively a right of first refusal in its favour to buy back the land, in the event of a future sale by PDT.

Following the PDT being placed into administration at the end of January, the Administrators, KPMG, acting on PDT’s behalf, have now offered the land and buildings back to the council for the same sum.

The council’s Contracts and Property Committee agreed that it should take the necessary steps to accept this offer and acquire the ownership of the Hub.

Looking to the future of the Hub, the committee also agreed that officers could enter into negotiations with KPMG to buy any equipment within the Hub including IT and catering equipment, and furniture items that would be needed by the council for the future running of the building.

Following completion of the sale, which may take a number of weeks due to the legal and due diligence process, the council will also take over landlord responsibilities for the tenants still operating from the Hub.

Work will now take place by council officers to investigate a range of options for the running and management of the building. They will also consider, with input from key stakeholders, including the community, how best it can serve the local area while ensuring the Hub has a sustainable economic model for the future.

Convenor for Neighbourhoods, Housing and Public Realm City Policy Committee and member of the Contracts and Property Committee, Councillor Greg Hepburn, said: “The news of the PDT’s administration and subsequent impact on The Legacy Hub and the services it provided, including the nursery, was a blow to the local community.

“However, after repeated attempts to stabilise the governance and financial side of things it became clear that it simply could not continue operating the way it had been.

“Now that the council are planning to buy back the Hub we have a chance to start afresh for a well-run, ambitious and thriving community facility, giving the community what they need but also something that is sustainable for the future.

“I look forward to working with the local community to influence the future of the of The Legacy Hub and realise their aspirations.”

COUNCILLORS BACK EQUAL PAY DEAL

Glasgow’s long-running equal pay dispute is over, after councillors formally approved a compensation deal for claimants.

Last month, the council and the equal pay claimant group represented by Action4Equality, UNISON, GMB and UNITE reached an agreement in principle on a package of payments worth at least £500 million.

Today [Thursday, 7 Feb], the council’s City Administration Committee backed the deal – setting in train a process expected to see workers receive details of their individual entitlements over the next few months and compensation paid from this summer.

Members also approved a financial strategy designed to fund the settlement – with some of the city’s property assets to be used to unlock loans.

Council leader Susan Aitken said: “I’m delighted to have won backing for a deal that finally delivers pay justice for thousands of women in our workforce.

“When I became council leader in 2017, I promised I’d bring to an end more than a decade of inaction on equal pay.

“A year ago, we began negotiations and, today, the council formally agreed a plan to pay women at Glasgow City Council what they are owed.

“That starts to put right a wrong that has damaged the council, its workforce and the city for too long.

“I want to thank the women for their determination; their dedication to the city and its people, and for trusting me to deliver what they have always deserved.

Today’s committee gave officers the go-ahead to use property assets to secure loans meeting the cost of settling pay claims.

Wholly-owned arm’s-length company City Property Glasgow Investments LLP is currently engaging lenders with the aim of refinancing a loan originally taken in 2010 – releasing significant additional value due to a growth in the value of its assets and more favourable interest rates.

The council will also sell a significant further portfolio of operational buildings to City Property and then lease them back at a commercial rate.

The purchase will be funded by long-term loans, with the lease payments meeting the annual cost of the borrowing.

Crucially, this means the buildings will remain in the city’s ownership and users will not see any difference in how they access them on a day-to-day basis.

Discussions are still ongoing with potential funders, however the council expects the Emirates Arena, Riverside Museum, SEC Armadillo, Scotstoun Leisure Centre, Tollcross International Swimming Centre, Glasgow Royal Concert Hall, Glasgow Museums Resource Centre, City Halls, Toryglen Football Centre, Gorbals Leisure Centre and Bellahouston Leisure Centre to become part of the City Property portfolio.

Cllr Aitken said: “I’ve always been clear that, although settling equal pay has been about delivering justice for thousands of the women in our workforce, meeting the substantial cost of doing that must be fair for citizens.

“Releasing the potential of our property, while keeping it in the city’s ownership, protects services and the future of these valued assets.”

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‘Let’s grow together’ is the call to anyone interested in growing food in Glasgow ahead of series of workshops intended to shape the city’s new food growing strategy.

As part of Glasgow’s commitment to becoming a sustainable food city, the council wants to see people to grow more food in their own neighbourhoods. It is envisaged that growing would take place in a wide variety of settings such as raised beds, planters, community gardens, allotments and orchards and include fruit, vegetables, herbs and flowers.

Under the Community Empowerment Act, the council now also has a responsibility to identify and increase the land within the city that can be used for allotments and, more generally, for plant cultivation. The legislation also expects there to be a focus on areas of socio-economic disadvantage when seeking to identify land for allotments and cultivation.

To ensure this work is directed properly, the council is currently developing a food growing strategy and is looking for the views of people involved with allotment associations, community gardens, food networks and food poverty groups as well as those on allotment waiting lists and members of the public simply interesting in growing.

To gather these view eight workshops are set to take place across the city between February and May 2019 with the first scheduled for Tollcross Leisure Centre on February 7 at 6pm. These workshops will aim to get an understanding of food growing currently underway in Glasgow, generate interest in food growing and identify potential growing sites. In addition, three of the eight workshops will also look the themes of social enterprise, outdoor learning and health in relation to food growing.

Councillor Anna Richardson, City Convenor for Sustainability and Carbon Reduction, urged anyone with an interest in growing their own food to come along to the workshops, which are free to attend.

Councillor Richardson said: “Ensuring Glasgow becomes a sustainable food city is a key part of the council’s overall plan for the city. Local food growing can help to address the city’s issues with food poverty but also promotes positive physical and mental well-being.

“Becoming a sustainable food city will only happen if we grow together as a food growing community. There is already considerable growing expertise in gardens, allotments and other spaces all across the city and it is essential we tap into this knowledge and experience as we shape our food growing strategy.

“The workshops are also about encouraging people who are interested in growing to get more involved. Participating in the workshops will give people a chance to have their say on the future of food growing in Glasgow.”

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Food growing workshops to help Glasgow become a sustainable food city

grow-together

‘Let’s grow together’ is the call to anyone interested in growing food in Glasgow ahead of series of workshops intended to shape the city’s new food growing strategy.

grow-together

As part of Glasgow’s commitment to becoming a sustainable food city, the council wants to see people to grow more food in their own neighbourhoods. It is envisaged that growing would take place in a wide variety of settings such as raised beds, planters, community gardens, allotments and orchards and include fruit, vegetables, herbs and flowers.

Under the Community Empowerment Act, the council now also has a responsibility to identify and increase the land within the city that can be used for allotments and, more generally, for plant cultivation. The legislation also expects there to be a focus on areas of socio-economic disadvantage when seeking to identify land for allotments and cultivation.

To ensure this work is directed properly, the council is currently developing a food growing strategy and is looking for the views of people involved with allotment associations, community gardens, food networks and food poverty groups as well as those on allotment waiting lists and members of the public simply interesting in growing.

To gather these view eight workshops are set to take place across the city between February and May 2019 with the first scheduled for Tollcross Leisure Centre on February 7 at 6pm. These workshops will aim to get an understanding of food growing currently underway in Glasgow, generate interest in food growing and identify potential growing sites. In addition, three of the eight workshops will also look the themes of social enterprise, outdoor learning and health in relation to food growing.

Councillor Anna Richardson, City Convenor for Sustainability and Carbon Reduction, urged anyone with an interest in growing their own food to come along to the workshops, which are free to attend.

Councillor Richardson said: “Ensuring Glasgow becomes a sustainable food city is a key part of the council’s overall plan for the city. Local food growing can help to address the city’s issues with food poverty but also promotes positive physical and mental well-being.

“Becoming a sustainable food city will only happen if we grow together as a food growing community. There is already considerable growing expertise in gardens, allotments and other spaces all across the city and it is essential we tap into this knowledge and experience as we shape our food growing strategy.

“The workshops are also about encouraging people who are interested in growing to get more involved. Participating in the workshops will give people a chance to have their say on the future of food growing in Glasgow.”